Bad Medicine: Doctors Doing Harm Since Hippocrates

Bad Medicine: Doctors Doing Harm Since Hippocrates

David Wootton / Feb 21, 2020

Bad Medicine Doctors Doing Harm Since Hippocrates We all face disease and death and rely on the medical profession to extend our lives Yet David Wootton argues from the fifth century BC until the s doctors actually did harm than good In this

  • Title: Bad Medicine: Doctors Doing Harm Since Hippocrates
  • Author: David Wootton
  • ISBN: 9780192803559
  • Page: 111
  • Format: Hardcover
  • We all face disease and death, and rely on the medical profession to extend our lives Yet, David Wootton argues, from the fifth century BC until the 1930s, doctors actually did harm than good In this controversial new account of the history of medicine, he asks just how much good it has done us over the years, and how much harm it continues to do today.

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      Posted by:David Wootton
      Published :2019-05-13T16:16:33+00:00

    About "David Wootton"

      • David Wootton

        MA, PhD Cantab , FRHistSDavid Wootton is Anniversary Professor of History He works on the intellectual and cultural history of the English speaking countries, Italy, and France, 1500 1800 He is currently writing a book entitled Power, Pleasure and Profit based on his Carlyle Lectures at the University of Oxford in 2014 His most recent book is The Invention of Science, published by Allen Lane.In 2016 he will give the annual Besterman Lecture at the University of Oxford.He was educated at Oxford and Cambridge, and has held positions in history and politics at four British and four Canadian universities, and visiting postions in the US, before coming to York.


    896 Comments

    1. The material is interesting but the 'I'm going against the grain! Look at me! Against the grain! Here is my against the grain thesis statement once more!' tone made me kind of wary. I'm also not sure what he says about ancient medicine and its influence is entirely correct. I just didn't really get a sense that Wootton knew what he was talking about - most of it sounded like cherry picking. It's a shame because the idea - trying to find out why medicine took as long as it did to advance - is int [...]



    2. Engrossing and terrifying investigation into the history of medicine. Read with a sick bag handy, if of weak disposition.


    3. This is an interesting, brisk potted history of medicine written for people like me who have read some history of science but don't know much about the history of medicine. Unfortunately, it's marred by the author's weird, grandiose attempts to turn minor disagreements with mainstream historical interpretations into existential critiques of academic history. For example, Wootton dates the birth of modern medicine in 1865 with the rise of Listerian antiseptic surgical practice. Other academic his [...]


    4. Wootton's book is thought-provoking for a number of reasons, especially when you, as I am, are interested in early technology. His point about the basis of Hippocratic/Galenic medicine (as apart from remedies not related to the underlying theory, and practical surgery) being complete ineffective nonsense - which, of course, is essentially true - should be made more often by the historians of ancient, medieval and early modern medical history. I knew the system was stubbornly maintained long beyo [...]


    5. Terrific. Brief, pointed, thoughtful and superbly original. Wootton, who is not a doctor, points out what they rarely do - that throughout human history, going to see a doctor has generally been bad for your health. He explores why this was and why it changed, all with gripping prose and a surprisingly small number of pages.


    6. Randomly picked this up at Oxfam the other day. Its quite interesting stuff and really gets going towards the end. I thought it needed a rather more thorough editor though. Its a bit plagued by repetition in parts.


    7. - choppy, accusatory argument that medicine, as an organized profession and historical fallacy, plotted to hinder progress, resist life-saving innovations, and experiment with vivisection



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