No Animals We Could Name

No Animals We Could Name

TedSanders / Jun 03, 2020

No Animals We Could Name The winner of the Bakeless Prize for Fiction a bold debut collection The animals human or otherwise in Ted Sanders s inventive wistful stories are oddly familiar yet unlike anyone you ve met before

  • Title: No Animals We Could Name
  • Author: TedSanders
  • ISBN: 9781555976163
  • Page: 155
  • Format: Paperback
  • The winner of the Bakeless Prize for Fiction, a bold debut collection The animals human or otherwise in Ted Sanders s inventive, wistful stories are oddly familiar, yet unlike anyone you ve met before A lion made of bedsheets, with chicken bones for teeth, is brought to life by a grieving mother When Raphael the pet lizard mysteriously loses his tail, his owners find tThe winner of the Bakeless Prize for Fiction, a bold debut collection The animals human or otherwise in Ted Sanders s inventive, wistful stories are oddly familiar, yet unlike anyone you ve met before A lion made of bedsheets, with chicken bones for teeth, is brought to life by a grieving mother When Raphael the pet lizard mysteriously loses his tail, his owners find themselves ever desperate to keep him alive, in one sense or another A pensive tug of war between an amateur angler and a halibut unfolds through the eyes of both fisherman and fish And in the collection s unifying novella, an unusual guest s arrival at a party sets idle gears turning in startling new ways.

    • Free Read [Poetry Book] ☆ No Animals We Could Name - by TedSanders ✓
      155 TedSanders
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      Posted by:TedSanders
      Published :2020-03-24T13:32:38+00:00

    About "TedSanders"

      • TedSanders

        Ted Sanders is the author of The Box and the Dragonfly, the first book in the new middle grade series The Keepers, coming in 2015 from HarperCollins Children s His first book, the short story collection No Animals We Could Name Graywolf 2012 , was the winner of the 2011 Bakeless Prize for Fiction His stories and essays have appeared in publications The Southern Review, Cincinnati Review, Georgia Review, and the O Henry Prize Stories anthology A recipient of a 2012 National Endowment for the Arts literature fellowship, he lives with his family in Urbana, Illinois, and teaches at the University of Illinois, Urbana Champaign.


    768 Comments

    1. About twice a year there is a description of a book in The New Yorker's "briefly noted" section that sounds like something I would enjoy reading. (The small amount isn't b/c I don't read a lot - it's b/c what they choose isn't attractive to me.) So I requested this book from the library, and the first thing I noticed (besides the pages still being stuck together, making me the first reader of this copy), was the PARAGRAPH-LONG list of funding this book got, complete with multiple logos from vari [...]


    2. From publisher for reviewRead 6/27/12 - 7/5/123.5 Stars - Recommended to fans of the short story and those who don't mind the deaths of animalsPgs: 234Publisher: Graywolf PressReleased: July 3, 2012So, my good friend Tara over at BookSexyReview has a theory. And in my experience, it's a pretty accurate one. If an animal is introduced into a story, that animal will surely die.If the story is about an animal, you can bet the farm the poor thing will be dead by the end of the book. Look at books li [...]


    3. If I could sit down with Ted Sanders, author of “No Animals We Could Name!”, it would probably go like this:Me: Ted, I was probably the wrong guy to review your short story collection. I read for recreation; I read for escapism. I don't mind a subtle message through the work; I don't mind a little challenge in tracking plot – but I do not like having to think too hard. “On the surface, this is sparse, but it's obvious there's a lot more hiding underneath. I HATE having to dig for it!”M [...]


    4. Well, it is not as if the stories were bad, but they just didn't touch or captivate me. A few were pretty good, but I could barely finish some, which is rare for short stories. They seemed to need more humor; they seemed to just plod along. I thought about just deleting it from my lists, but I thought, "No. I read it, I should say something, even if not glowing." No doubt some readers will enjoy them, though I suspect some of the reviewers were being too kind in their praise. Still, writers with [...]


    5. Some of these stories were very uncomfortable to read, like The Lion, and Putting the Lizard to Sleep, and especially Momentary


    6. Overall, this collection of stories is haunting. Most are spent entirely in the head of a character, experiencing their thoughts and feelings, but there is still quite a bit of action in most of the stories. In many cases, extended metaphors are used, particularly ones with animals, and these are especially effective. For example, in the opening story, obit, a bear helps a woman fish and sings her to sleep at night. In exchange, she feeds him peppermint. In the end this sacrifice on the bear's p [...]


    7. full-stop/2012/07/02/rReview by Ben JahnIt is sometimes said of a book of fiction that it teaches its reader how to read on its terms. Such books are often reflexive, hintingly aware of what’s happening between reader and text. The stories in Ted Sanders’ varied, fascinating collection, No Animals We Could Name — winner of the 2011 Bakeless Prize, out in July from Graywolf — take on their own such awareness, teaching the reader to read their intricate language.The opening story, “Obit, [...]


    8. 3.5 stars. I received this book in a giveaway from Graywolf Press (thank you!). I was very interested in this book, as it is a collection of short stories by a new author for my shelves. The descriptions I had initially read told me I would definitely like this book.The bookend stories of "Obit" and "Assembly" are daring and experimental, which thrilled me, although I felt a little unfulfilled hope that some elements would develop more. Several of the stories were interesting but also somewhat i [...]


    9. Man this guy can write prose. Ive rarely read sentences that make you see an image as well as these do. And he gets at powerful images very subtlely. I had to put the book down and revel in an image more than once. Ive read some other reviews and none seem to mention that this book is really just a novella broken into three parts and surrounded by lesser stories. The novella, called airbag, is amazing. The characters are relatable and mythic at the same time. They are larger than his language. I [...]


    10. Solid recommendation; most of these stories are quite good. Not all of them, but most of them. The "Airbag" trilogy, with tiny Dorlene, is intense and strange and particularly good. It'll stick with you for a long time. Another reviewer expressed concerns that these short stories, with "Animals" in the title, might be something like "Old Yeller" and "Bambi" -- that is, too sad to read comfortably. Trust me: have no worries. Not even remotely similar.Wondering where the title,No Animals We Could [...]


    11. I don't think I have ever read a book like this before. It seemed to take forever for me to finish reading. But that is not a bad thing at all!!! The author has a way of writing in such that after almost each of the short stories I had to put the book down and walk away for awhile. I was sent into complete sensory overload. His writing draws you completely in, allowing you to see, smell, taste, touchl of it. Superb!Awesome work!!! I truly enjoyed readingThank you!! Looking forward to seeing what [...]


    12. I got this book as a first read. The book, as a whole is well written, some of the stories are disconnected and very difficult to follow along with the little development of characters which in turn make them feel distant and unrelateable to the reader.If you like abstract reading, then this is the book for you if you can't tell I'm not that into. I don't think I have ever read a book like this before. It seemed to take forever for me to finish reading.


    13. As with all collections, some of the stories were better than others. But the overall effect was pretty great. In the introduction, Stacey D'Erasmo says, "This is the music I have been waiting for," and that's a pretty good way to sum things up. The prose in this book is magical at times. Story-wise, the highlights for me were "Obit," "Momentary," "Flounder," and "Jane," which is the kind of a ghost story I've been thinking about a lot lately.


    14. While the book, as a whole is well written, some of the stories are disconnected and very difficult to follow. There is little development of characters which makes some (okay most) of them feel distant and unrelateable If you enjoy abstract reading, then this is the book for you. I, however, enjoy plots, characters and relationships too much to be able to savor the uniqueness of this collection of short stories.


    15. I won this book in one of the Giveaways.This book was incredibly bizarre. The first story was completely confusing, as the paragraphs were placed randomly on the page, not really in sequential order. After that, the book was okay. Some of the stories were interesting, others left me scratching my head, wondering what on earth I had just read. Overall, it was an okay book.


    16. A lot of reviews say to not read it if you love animals. I can kinda sorta agree. Every chapter involves a creature of sorts and have a sad ending. Each chapter has a very different style in itself. Some have more parts as in continuation. Very unique book I can say, never read something like this. Overall is a great book to read and of course to have.


    17. This unusual collection of stories was arresting when the author could rein in his penchant for meandering. A story about a family's decision to euthanize their injured pet lizard was entirely too long, in my view.


    18. God damn, this was good. In an attempt to inject a little spontaneity in my life, I try to pick a book randomly from shelves every time I hit the library. Last time, this was it. This book has won several awards, was backed by a whole grab-bag of arts organizatons, and was worth every penny.


    19. These stories were, at times, difficult to read due to tone and content, but in the end, his writing (the moments and details he selects to give voice to, and the way he does so) kept bringing me back. Poignant and sincere.




    20. I had to give up after about 125 pages. I like his prose, but the content of the stories are insufferable.


    21. This book is kinda like the amateur hour, seed of an idea that could have started "House of Leaves," starring animals. Just read "House of Leaves."




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