Introduction to the Internal Family Systems Model

Introduction to the Internal Family Systems Model

Richard C. Schwartz / Feb 27, 2020

Introduction to the Internal Family Systems Model Internal Family Systems Therapy is one of the fastest growing approaches to psychotherapy It has developed over the past twenty years into a way of understanding and treating human problems that is em

  • Title: Introduction to the Internal Family Systems Model
  • Author: Richard C. Schwartz
  • ISBN: 9780972148009
  • Page: 109
  • Format: Paperback
  • Internal Family Systems Therapy is one of the fastest growing approaches to psychotherapy It has developed over the past twenty years into a way of understanding and treating human problems that is empowering, effective, and nonpathologizing Internal Family Systems IFS involves helping people heal by listening inside themselves in a new way to different parts feelInternal Family Systems Therapy is one of the fastest growing approaches to psychotherapy It has developed over the past twenty years into a way of understanding and treating human problems that is empowering, effective, and nonpathologizing Internal Family Systems IFS involves helping people heal by listening inside themselves in a new way to different parts feelings or thoughts and, in the process, unburdening themselves of extreme beliefs, emotions, sensations, and urges that constrain their lives As they unburden, people have access to Self, our most precious human resource, and are better able to lead their lives from that centered, confident, compassionate place.In this book, Richard Schwartz, the developer of the Internal Family Systems Model, introduces its basic concepts and methods in an engaging, understandable, and personal style Therapists will find that the book deepens their appreciation of the IFS Model and helps their clients understand what they are experiencing in therapy Also included are user friendly exercises to facilitate learning.

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      Published :2019-06-15T18:40:32+00:00

    About "Richard C. Schwartz"

      • Richard C. Schwartz

        Richard C. Schwartz Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Introduction to the Internal Family Systems Model book, this is one of the most wanted Richard C. Schwartz author readers around the world.


    938 Comments

    1. I think I could have used some more examples and exercises in the last part of the book - a lot of this can be fairly abstract - but in general the theory being espoused here is powerful, profound, and well presented. Richard C. Schwartz employs a very accessible conversational style, addresses potential doubts and reservations head-on, and includes a lot of examples from his personal life to keep the theory grounded and relatable.I particularly liked that he spent some time showing how this the [...]


    2. Strangely organized and lacks any indication that evidence exists for the IFS model of therapy. Some of it seems too rosy, making me skeptical that the author is willing to admit bad things too himself. Supposedly every part of every person is good. Also, everyone's true Self is calm, curious, compassionate, confident, creative, and courageous, among other virtues. I mean, it's possible, I guess, but the author doesn't seem to recognize that this fantastic news would require a lot of evidence.Th [...]


    3. Helpful for therapists but also general audience because it is written in easy-to-understand lay language. About our "age parts," i.e.: younger parts of ourselves who have certain needs and feelings. Sometimes are younger parts have magic thinking that they want us to think is reality. These young parts need to be validated but also reminded by our older parts that "I will always be here. I will never leave you. You are taken care of." Here is the website where this school of thought/therapy com [...]


    4. It is exactly what the title suggests—and the basic structure of the mind that IFS lays out is so useful that this book could benefit any reader. Even at its relatively short length, it could be edited down to about 100 pages and do just as well; still, I plan on recommending chapters of this—or even the whole thing at times—with clients.


    5. This is a good introduction to a model by the developer. Some of his explanation were wonderful to read. Even if the model is not for you, this text explains his theory beautifully. The explanation is intelligently written and enjoyable to read.


    6. I don't know how or if you will relate to it, but internal family systems theory resonates with me. I think we are all made up of 'parts' that we inherit from our families mostly and sometimes these can get intertwined and compete with the self if we don't recognize and acknowledge them.


    7. Psychotherapist Richard Schwartz, the developer of internal family systems therapy, introduces this model to people seeking an understanding and/or healing of their own psyches and to therapists who might wish to be trained in such "parts work."


    8. Excellent introduction, definitely only that though. Can't wait to learn the theory in more depth. a well laid out and seemingly true theory of the person and how to deal with them therapeutically.


    9. This approach to self-work is wonderfully resonant with Eugene Gendlen's "Focusing" and Thich Nhat Hanh's "Reconciliation" - kind of a mental health trilogy.


    10. Easy to read & very understandable. Good book for people in the treatment field, and for clients looking to learn about IFS and how it works.


    11. Short, direct, simple explanations: In our life, parts of us suffer, another part intervenes, managing the situation, protecting the suffering part, taking on a role that it doesn't want, but feels it has to. In the end the suffering part is exiled, wanting to say why it suffers, trying to escape the vigilance of the manager-part. The self is hidden, lost in between all these conflicting parts. If the exiled escapes, the firefighter part comes in, trying to return everything to that simulacre of [...]


    12. Just finished working thru this with my TalkSpace counselor. I really enjoyed this approach and found it natural to think about myself as containing multiple parts, maybe due to my overactive imagination and writing background. I'm used to feeling like I have tons of people inside of me. It's helped me deal with a lot of stuff. Highly recommend.



    13. A lot of cyclical reasoning (e.g. the Self is curious, creative, and spontaneous- you know your Self is present when you're curious, creative, and spontaneous) but good overall. I feel that people respond well to parts work. I like the structure of the theory but wish there was more research on the efficacy and process.


    14. This book explains IFS so clearly and has a summary at the end of the different parts we can work with. This is now my go-to model for therapy.


    15. This book was recommended by a friend who is a proponent of IFS. I found the book easy to read and a good (as the title says) introduction to IFS. It has whetted my interest is this type of therapy and I will be reading more books on this subject.


    16. Another contribution from my Trauma teacher. I wonder if the "new-agey" antecedents for his picks are unwitting or not. This book contains a good metaphor for helping people get in touch with their competing "selves." It recommends the impossible -- organize them your Self.




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