The Flying Tigers

The Flying Tigers

John Willard Toland / Mar 29, 2020

The Flying Tigers During World War II a group of American fighter pilots roamed the skies over China and Burma menacing the Japanese war effort without letup Flamboyant daring and courageous they were called the F

  • Title: The Flying Tigers
  • Author: John Willard Toland
  • ISBN: 9780440926214
  • Page: 183
  • Format: Hardcover
  • During World War II, a group of American fighter pilots roamed the skies over China and Burma, menacing the Japanese war effort without letup Flamboyant, daring, and courageous, they were called the Flying Tigers The Tigers, who had been recruited from the Army, Navy, and Marines, first saw action as a volunteer group fighting on the side of the Chiang Kia shek s China aDuring World War II, a group of American fighter pilots roamed the skies over China and Burma, menacing the Japanese war effort without letup Flamboyant, daring, and courageous, they were called the Flying Tigers The Tigers, who had been recruited from the Army, Navy, and Marines, first saw action as a volunteer group fighting on the side of the Chiang Kia shek s China against Japan Trained in the unconventional air combat tactics of their maverick leader Claire Lee Chennault, they racked up some of the most impresive air victory records of World War II This is the story of Chennault and his magnificent Tigers and how they performed the impossible.

    • [PDF] ↠ Unlimited ¾ The Flying Tigers : by John Willard Toland ↠
      183 John Willard Toland
    • thumbnail Title: [PDF] ↠ Unlimited ¾ The Flying Tigers : by John Willard Toland ↠
      Posted by:John Willard Toland
      Published :2019-011-09T22:22:55+00:00

    About "John Willard Toland"

      • John Willard Toland

        John Willard Toland June 29, 1912 in La Crosse, Wisconsin January 4, 2004 in Danbury, Connecticut was an American author and historian He is best known for his biography of Adolf Hitler 1 Toland tried to write history as a straightforward narrative, with minimal analysis or judgment This method may have stemmed from his original goal of becoming a playwright In the summers between his college years, he travelled with hobos and wrote several plays with hobos as central characters, none of which achieved the stage 2 At one point he managed to publish an article on dirigibles in Look magazine it proved extremely popular and led to his career as a historian.One exception to his general approach is his Infamy Pearl Harbor and Its Aftermath about the Pearl Harbor attack and the investigations of it, in which he wrote about evidence that President Franklin Roosevelt knew in advance of plans to attack the naval base but remained silent The book was widely criticized at the time Since the original publication, Toland added new evidence and rebutted early critics Also, an anonymous source, known as Seaman Z Robert D Ogg has since come forth to publicly tell his story.Perhaps his most important work, for which he won the Pulitzer Prize in 1971, is The Rising Sun Based on original and extensive interviews with high Japanese officials who survived the war, the book chronicles Imperial Japan from the military rebellion of February 1936 to the end of World War II The book won the Pulitzer because it was the first book in English to tell the history of the war in the Pacific from the Japanese point of view, rather than from an American perspective.The stories of the battles for the stepping stones to Japan, the islands in the Pacific which had come under Japanese domination, are told from the perspective of the commander sitting in his cave rather than from that of the heroic forces engaged in the assault Most of these commanders committed suicide at the conclusion of the battle, but Toland was able to reconstruct their viewpoint from letters to their wives and from reports they sent to Tokyo Toland died in 2004 of pneumonia.While predominantly a non fiction author, Toland also wrote two historical novels, Gods of War and Occupation He says in his autobiography that he earned little money from his Pulitzer Prize winning, The Rising Sun, but was set for life from the earnings of his biography of Hitler, for which he also did original research.enpedia wiki John_Tol


    310 Comments


    1. AVG - American Volunteer Group, a group of aviators who were trained to fly a specific plane to advantage against the newest and best planes. Chennault had been trained in the US and was recruited by the Chinese to come and help protect China from the Japanese. He had the latest intelligence on what the Japanese were flying and where they were headed. He went to the top and still did not really get the help he needed to do what would eventually prove to be good and bad, good because the men ende [...]


    2. This is a great story of Claire Lee Chennault, and his magnificent Tigers, a group of pilots in WWII who accomplished the impossible and whose heroics helped to win the war.


    3. This was a very good book. I felt it was better than the John Wayne movie. I actually wish the movie had been like this book. It was very easy to read and follow.


    4. I had a half-dozen of the Random House "Landmark" series of history books masquerading as biographies when I was a kid. I didn't have this one, and reading it today was just as enjoyable as reading the ones I had in the 70s. While the patriotic message is more than obvious, the personal sacrifice made by the pilots of the Flying Tigers is told in a very straightforward, factual way with enough personality of the individual men to give that "being there" feeling.


    5. One of the first books I ever read was John Toland's "The Flying Tigers"; and I know I read it while in kindergarten, because I finger-painted my version of the same Book-of-the-Month Club cover above, with a glorious shark mouth on a P-40 zooming over the Burmese Jungle.


    6. History of the American fifgter pilots who flew for the Chinese against the Japanese as mercanaries prior to the US entry into World War II. Most survivors would re-enter the US military following Pearl Harbor.




    Leave a Reply