The Legend of the Baal-Shem

The Legend of the Baal-Shem

Martin Buber Maurice S. Friedman / Apr 07, 2020

The Legend of the Baal Shem The Jewish philosopher Martin Buber spoke directly to the most profound human concerns in all his works including his discussions of Hasidism a mystical religious movement founded in Eastern Europe

  • Title: The Legend of the Baal-Shem
  • Author: Martin Buber Maurice S. Friedman
  • ISBN: 9780691043890
  • Page: 279
  • Format: Paperback
  • The Jewish philosopher Martin Buber spoke directly to the most profound human concerns in all his works, including his discussions of Hasidism, a mystical religious movement founded in Eastern Europe by Israel ben Eliezer, called the Baal Shem the Master of God s Name Living in the first part of the eighteenth century in Podolia and Wolhynia, the Baal Shem braved scornThe Jewish philosopher Martin Buber spoke directly to the most profound human concerns in all his works, including his discussions of Hasidism, a mystical religious movement founded in Eastern Europe by Israel ben Eliezer, called the Baal Shem the Master of God s Name Living in the first part of the eighteenth century in Podolia and Wolhynia, the Baal Shem braved scorn and rejection from the rabbinical establishment and attracted followers from among the common people, the poor, and the mystically inclined Here Buber offers a sensitive and intuitive account of Hasidism, followed by twenty stories about the life of the Baal Shem This book is the earliest and one of the most delightful of Buber s seven volumes on Hasidism and can be read not only as a collection of myth but as a key to understanding the central theme of Buber s thought the I Thou, or dialogical, relationship.

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    About "Martin Buber Maurice S. Friedman"

      • Martin Buber Maurice S. Friedman

        Martin Buber was an Austrian born Jewish philosopher best known for his philosophy of dialogue, a religious existentialism centered on the distinction between the I Thou relationship and the I It relationship.Buber came from a family of observant Jews, but broke with Jewish custom to pursue secular studies in philosophy In 1902, Buber became the editor of the weekly Die Welt, the central organ of the Zionist movement, although he later withdrew from organizational work in Zionism In 1923 Buber wrote his famous essay on existence, Ich und Du later translated into English as I and Thou , and in 1925 he began translating the Hebrew Bible into the German language.In 1930 Buber became an honorary professor at the University of Frankfurt am Main, and resigned in protest from his professorship immediately after Adolf Hitler came to power in 1933 He then founded the Central Office for Jewish Adult Education, which became an increasingly important body as the German government forbade Jews to attend public education In 1938, Buber left Germany and settled in Jerusalem, in the British Mandate of Palestine, receiving a professorship at Hebrew University and lecturing in anthropology and introductory sociology.


    225 Comments

    1. The single greatest story of all time is in here, about the boys who loved each other and talked under the birches in the summer time. The one about the language of the birds is interesting, and the picture of the Baal-Shem is actually sort of bland, an inscrutable holy man who presides over matters of law with wierd parables. There are lots of stories within a story, narratives which seem to exist to be the conduit for another story.


    2. Beautiful tales of what sounds like a beautiful man. At least a little study of the Baal-Shem is necessary for non-Jews to understand the emotional revolution that was Chasidism and Jews to understand how far Chasidism has fallen.


    3. Stories within stories, lessons hidden in lessons, identities revealed - this collection of legends of the Hasidic rabbi are powerful little tales, while some of the parables' meaning is lost on me, the overall effect is a wonderful incorporation of poetry, fable, and instruction. A nice template.


    4. Got this, actually an earlier edition from 1931, about 20 years ago from the shelf of a retired pastor and finally made the time to read it interesting and the themes Buber pulls out of this old mystic sect of Judaism resonate still with faithful people seeking a deeper expereince offaith.



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