The Mzungu Boy

The Mzungu Boy

Meja Mwangi / Sep 20, 2019

The Mzungu Boy Winner Children s Africana Book Award Best Book for Older ReadersFor young Kariuki life in a small village in central Kenya is one great adventure And when he meets Nigel life becomes even interesti

  • Title: The Mzungu Boy
  • Author: Meja Mwangi
  • ISBN: 9780888996640
  • Page: 228
  • Format: Paperback
  • Winner, Children s Africana Book Award Best Book for Older ReadersFor young Kariuki, life in a small village in central Kenya is one great adventure And when he meets Nigel life becomes even interesting Nigel is from England and he has come to visit his great grandfather, the fearsome Bwana Ruin who owns the farm where all the villagers work The villagers call NiWinner, Children s Africana Book Award Best Book for Older ReadersFor young Kariuki, life in a small village in central Kenya is one great adventure And when he meets Nigel life becomes even interesting Nigel is from England and he has come to visit his great grandfather, the fearsome Bwana Ruin who owns the farm where all the villagers work The villagers call Nigel the mzungu boy, and they view him with suspicion and fear.Nevertheless, Kariuki becomes friends with Nigel and the two spend happy days exploring the forest together Then one day the two boys decide to hunt down Old Moses, the biggest, ugliest, oldest and meanest warthog in the forest The hunt takes them deeper into the jungle than Kariuki has ever gone, and his beloved forest becomes a frightening place, filled with dangerous creatures, including the Mau mau, the mysterious men who have guns and are plotting against Bwana Ruin and the white soldiers And when Nigel suddenly disappears, Kariuki realizes that it is up to him to save his friend.

    • Free Read [Philosophy Book] ✓ The Mzungu Boy - by Meja Mwangi ↠
      228 Meja Mwangi
    • thumbnail Title: Free Read [Philosophy Book] ✓ The Mzungu Boy - by Meja Mwangi ↠
      Posted by:Meja Mwangi
      Published :2019-06-14T12:08:43+00:00

    About "Meja Mwangi"

      • Meja Mwangi

        Meja Mwangi began his writing career in the 1970s, a decade after his well known compatriots such as Ngugi wa Thiong o and Grace Ogot had been publishing their works When he burst onto the scene with the award winning Kill Me Quick in 1973, Mwangi was hailed in various quarters as a rising star in the East African literary constellation who was helping to disprove Taban lo Liyong s oft cited claim that East Africa was a literary desert Taban 1965, Nazareth 1976 Since then, Meja Mwangi has gone on to establish himself as one of the most prolific of Kenyan writers, publishing eleven novels in seventeen years in addition to short stories, children s books and working with a variety of projects in film Mwangi s works have received awards in Kenya and abroad, they have been translated into six languages, and there are film versions of two of his novels.While Mwangi has touched on all of these concerns, we might divide his work into three major categories The first comprises his Mau Mau novels For many Kenyan writers, the armed resistance to British colonialism in Kenya, which came to be known as the Mau Mau revolt and reached its height in the 1950s, was a far reaching experience Weapon of Hunger is perhaps Meja Mwangi s best book yet The picture he paints of the relentless quest for modern Africa is grim What is most depressing, is that there seem to be no solutions Western philanthropists, such as Jack Rivers, are portrayed in a favourable light as sincere people All their energies, however, are expended on trying to understand Africa s problems and once they understand them they realise that the problems are beyond them As for the Africans themselves, they could have provided solutions, but since they are lined up in warring factions, that is impossible While the two sides fight on to the finish, will million of ordinary people continue to starve to dead That is the questions which Meja Mwangi asks himself and which he asks the readers of Weapon Lynn Mansure, Weekly Review


    995 Comments

    1. My favourite characters in this story were Jimi the dog, and Lesson One. This book is a classic masterpiece and one of the funniest LOL historically accurate books I have ever read. It spans the (mis)adventures of Kariuki and Nigel (the little white man or mzungu boy) while tensions mount in the country due to the growing Mau Mau rebellion of the 50s-60s. Never has there been a more entertaining story about the way of life while still portraying the ongoing struggle for independence from British [...]


    2. "They shot into the still pool and went round and round in the eddies without moving their feet until they reached the dark, quiet places where the water never moved."Gorgeously written, although certainly a grim book in many ways, with pretty unflinching depictions of how native Kenyans were brutalized under a colonial system. Unfortunately, I successfully predicted a large amount of the book's plot arc, but that wasn't a huge problem for me. I really really liked this. 4.5 stars.



    3. Kariuki is a Kenyan boy who lives and works with his family on Bwana Ruin’s farm along with other villagers. Bwana Ruin has made all of the villagers believe that white people are somehow more important than brown people and that he’s a better boss than any of the other white landowners in Kenya. Then Bwana Ruin’s grandson, Nigel, comes to visit him on the farm and Nigel and Kariuki become friends. Although they come from different worlds they are soon inseparable. Kariuki’s parents are [...]


    4. I was pleasantly surprised how much better I liked The Mzungu Boy than Burn My Heart. I was really able to identify with Kariuki, although since this story takes a side I thought that the character of Nigel was lacking in a lot of personality, or at least not brought together in a way that makes sense. He is clearly impulsive, demanding, brave to the point of fool hardy, and also kind and just but we are given no reasons about why is he like this and why he is so different from the rest of the w [...]


    5. Set in British-ruled Kenya in the early '50s, this is the story of Kariuki, a Kenyan boy who becomes friends with Nigel, an English boy who's come to stay on his grandparents' farm during the summer.[return][return]What I really liked about this book is how honest it was. While the boys are friends, it doesn't paint an idealistic portrait of their friendship. Being friends doesn't magically make the horrible things that are going on any better, nor does it solve any problems. In fact, it only ma [...]


    6. Kariuki thinks that life in Kenya’s villages is a fabulous adventure. The land around his village is extremely wild, but Kariuki knows it really well. One day, a new boy from England came to Kariuki’s village to visit his grandpa. The boy’s name is Nigel, but the villagers call him the mzungu boy because they view him with fear and disbelief.When Kariuki and Nigel had a good friendship, they determined to hunt in one of Kariuki’s favorite forests. That hunting trip was deeper than Kariuk [...]


    7. I re-read this book to remind my self why I liked it so much. If my memory serves me right it is the first 'real book' I loved. I remember telling my my mom about and she also liked it so much that he read the whole book for her English class. Something about it touched me about Kariuki's story way back then and I confirmed it still does. Oh! and it was called Little White Man then :)


    8. Another Mau Mau Rebellion story, but the war is not as prominent of a feature in the narrative, though the portrayal of the Kenyan landscape is harshly beautiful. I didn't like this as much as Burn my Heart, though half of my classmates preferred it, so.




    9. This book was very interesting. It showed the difference in lifestyle between America and Africa. I recommend this book.





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