Free Flight: Inventing the Future of Travel

Free Flight: Inventing the Future of Travel

James M. Fallows / May 25, 2020

Free Flight Inventing the Future of Travel The troubles of the airline system have become acute in the post terrorist era As the average cost of a flight has come down in the last twenty years the airlines have survived by keeping planes full

  • Title: Free Flight: Inventing the Future of Travel
  • Author: James M. Fallows
  • ISBN: 9781586481407
  • Page: 442
  • Format: Paperback
  • The troubles of the airline system have become acute in the post terrorist era As the average cost of a flight has come down in the last twenty years, the airlines have survived by keeping planes full and funneling traffic through a centralized hub and spoke routing system Virtually all of the technological innovation in airplanes in the last thirty years has been devoteThe troubles of the airline system have become acute in the post terrorist era As the average cost of a flight has come down in the last twenty years, the airlines have survived by keeping planes full and funneling traffic through a centralized hub and spoke routing system Virtually all of the technological innovation in airplanes in the last thirty years has been devoted to moving passengers efficiently between major hubs But what was left out of this equation was the convenience and flexibility of the average traveler Now, because of heightened security, hours of waiting are tacked onto each trip As James Fallows vividly explains, a technological revolution is under way that will relieve this problem Free Flight features the stories of three groups who are inventing and building the future of all air travel NASA, Cirrus Design in Duluth, Minnesota, and Eclipse Aviation in Albuquerque, New Mexico These ventures should make it possible for people to travel the way corporate executives have for years in small jet planes, from the airport that s closest to their home or office directly to the airport closest to where they really want to go This will be possible because of a product now missing from the vast array of flying devices small, radically inexpensive jet planes, as different from airliners as personal computers are from mainframes And, as Fallows explains in a new preface, a system that avoids the congestion of the overloaded hub system will offer advantages in speed, convenience, and especially security in the new environment of air travel.

    • ☆ Free Flight: Inventing the Future of Travel || ✓ PDF Read by ↠ James M. Fallows
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      Posted by:James M. Fallows
      Published :2020-02-24T17:46:49+00:00

    About "James M. Fallows"

      • James M. Fallows

        James M. Fallows Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Free Flight: Inventing the Future of Travel book, this is one of the most wanted James M. Fallows author readers around the world.


    311 Comments

    1. Notes: 12/12/13Free Flight 9781586480400The author has a great deal of "RA RA" enthusiasm.His basic premise that commercial air travel is a pain, was obvious in the late90's. I've only flown once in the TSA era, but I suspect it's gotten muchworse. The psychological aspect of dealing with the TSA idiots adds a cost inaggravation.The downside to the book however, is that the author either used redundancy toget his message across, couldn't help himself, or just needed to perform betterediting. :le [...]


    2. Not just for pilots, this book suggests an alternative to airline travel. The author notes that despite technological advances, airline travel, especially over smaller distances using regional airlines, is becoming slower and slower. It's partly due to the economical hub and spoke system of the airlines and partly due to all the bottlenecks - traffic, increased security etc. He suggests that an alternative is small aircraft - fast props and small jets. He notes (the book was written is 2002) tha [...]


    3. The really interesting thing about the book is that it's been updated by an article Fallows wrote in The Atlantic in May 2008. Otherwise it might be considered as just another set of hi-tech aviation dreams that were lost in the wake of the dot-com crash at the beginning of the century


    4. Despite any intentions of deeper meaning, this book is mostly just Fallows geeking out about the history and experience of flying small planes. And I loved it. It made me want to run out the door and sign up for flying lessons.


    5. Written back in 2002. An interesting look into the furture of General Aviation aircraft. Worked out well for Cirrus Aircraft, not so well for Eclipse --- tried marketing small jets and went bankrupt.



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