Teaching the Restless: One School's Remarkable No-Ritalin Approach to Helping Children Learn and Succeed

Teaching the Restless: One School's Remarkable No-Ritalin Approach to Helping Children Learn and Succeed

Chris Mercogliano / Sep 15, 2019

Teaching the Restless One School s Remarkable No Ritalin Approach to Helping Children Learn and Succeed ducator Chris Mercogliano has been working with hyperactive ADHD children for many years at the Free School in Albany New York and has developed numerous ways to help these students relax focus mo

  • Title: Teaching the Restless: One School's Remarkable No-Ritalin Approach to Helping Children Learn and Succeed
  • Author: Chris Mercogliano
  • ISBN: 9780807032572
  • Page: 490
  • Format: Paperback
  • ducator Chris Mercogliano has been working with hyperactive ADHD children for many years at the Free School in Albany, New York, and has developed numerous ways to help these students relax, focus, modulate emotional expression, make responsible choices, and forge lasting friendships all prerequisites for learning In Teaching the Restless, Mercogliano uses the stories oducator Chris Mercogliano has been working with hyperactive ADHD children for many years at the Free School in Albany, New York, and has developed numerous ways to help these students relax, focus, modulate emotional expression, make responsible choices, and forge lasting friendships all prerequisites for learning In Teaching the Restless, Mercogliano uses the stories of six boys and three girls to share valuable lessons, offering a way to work with these children without assigning them labels or resorting to the use of stimulant drugs like Ritalin.

    • [PDF] ✓ Unlimited ¼ Teaching the Restless: One School's Remarkable No-Ritalin Approach to Helping Children Learn and Succeed : by Chris Mercogliano ↠
      490 Chris Mercogliano
    • thumbnail Title: [PDF] ✓ Unlimited ¼ Teaching the Restless: One School's Remarkable No-Ritalin Approach to Helping Children Learn and Succeed : by Chris Mercogliano ↠
      Posted by:Chris Mercogliano
      Published :2019-06-02T20:09:19+00:00

    About "Chris Mercogliano"

      • Chris Mercogliano

        Chris is the author of How to Grow a School Starting and Sustaining Schools That Work , In Defense of Childhood , Teaching the Restless , and Making It Up as We Go Along and long time director at The Free School in Albany.


    365 Comments

    1. I thought this book was going to be about the strategies a public school took to keep kids off meds, so I was annoyed when I realized that the school in question was a Sudbury-style free school, a school that pretty much could not be more different than a typical public school. "Of course," I thought to myself as I rolled my eyes, "Of course you can keep these kids off meds when you give them freedom to be who they are and don't try to mash their creative, energetic little selves into unnatural [...]


    2. This book was captivating. It was such a novel, refreshing take on teaching children labelled as having ADHD. Mercogliano describes in an honest, heartwarming way his perspective as an educator as he supports his students in the Free School he works at. At the Free School these children, diagnosed with ADHD and sometimes forced by school boards to take medications that essentially numb their minds, are not allowed to take Ritalin. Instead, they are engaged in a very open-ended form of education [...]


    3. Story of Albany Free School. Let's see if it has any implications for my classroom. Nope. Just skimmed this one because it wasn't that good. Free school is hippy-dippy place where the kids decide what and when they are learning. Fine in practice, but in high-stakes testing world I teach in, there isn't a chance of this being put into place.


    4. I really enjoyed this book. The author is an excellent writer and has a skilled way of drawing quickly into the lives of the children he describes. As a public school teacher myself, I first felt that I was being labeled as the "bad" educator, but as I read I realized that the author is not blaming teachers for what is wrong with our educational system, but is blaming the system itself and the dysfunctional culture that has created it. There are many pieces that come together to create "Ritalin [...]


    5. This book is a smooth and easy read due to having an anecdotal plot. At the same time the author's views and opinions make it intelligent and insightful.This book focuses on the type of kids who don't easily succeed in the traditional school system because they are so energetic and independent-minded(often labeled ADHD and prescribed biopsychiatric drugs like Ritalin and Aderol). Coupled with difficult home lives, these kids are often expelled from school (even at a very young age) because their [...]


    6. A really thought-provoking book for anyone who has, has worked with, or has taught hyper-active children and/or those labeled AD(H)D. Mercogliano is very upfront about his bias against medicating children with biopsychiatric drugs and offers insight and anecdotes from his 30+ year experience teaching in a "free" school (very similar to a Montessori approach). I appreciated his willingness to view each child as an individual, to seek to uncover any and all factors influencing the child's behavior [...]


    7. This is not a how-to book for people looking for methods that will work with rambunctious kids. This is the story of several children who were either forced to, or candidates for, Ritalin and other "behavioral" drugs for children. The author, a director at the school the kids entered into, the Albany Free School, makes no bones about his bias against these drugs. He tells the stories of their experiences there.It's a great read. It reminds us to look at children as full humans and respect them a [...]


    8. please read this if youre into alternative education or parenting. i picked it up because i visited the school and was pretty interested in their philosophies. although it only applies somewhat to the 10 hours a week i spend working with kids at an after school, its confirmed my sense of the need for individuality and working at your own pace in learning. i always felt annoyed when i couldnt keep up with some learning in school. its seems its better just focus on finding the right social outlets [...]


    9. I really enjoyed the beginning of this book and the explanation of the Free School philosphy, but it got quite preachy in the middle. The author blames both absentee/uninvolved fathers and unattached/distracted mothers for their childrenss' ADHD. His short discussion of 'unbonded' children shows only a superfical understanding of attachment and bonding. I felt that his theories and analysis of the root causes of ADHD distracted from the much more interesting story of how a different learning env [...]


    10. thought provoking for sure! while it references various studies and research, it was easy to read. valuable for teachers, parents, and concerned individuals. really strong call for caring for the inner healing of children and not settling for quick fixes. as an educator, i would have liked to know more about the logistics of the "free school". corroborates other things i've been hearing about how tv watching (regardless of any "educational value" it may have) is soooooo harmful to kids.


    11. really caused a lot of reflection on growing up add, and ways it interacts with my life now- has gotten me thinking a LOT about teaching at less traditional schools.


    12. Really made me question the way in which we medicate/educate our students. The Free School (upon which this book is based) sounds like a truly innovative and special place for young learners.


    Leave a Reply