Sylvia Wynter: On Being Human as Praxis

Sylvia Wynter: On Being Human as Praxis

Katherine McKittrick / Jun 04, 2020

Sylvia Wynter On Being Human as Praxis The Jamaican writer and cultural theorist Sylvia Wynter is best known for her diverse writings that pull together insights from theories in history literature science and black studies to explore

  • Title: Sylvia Wynter: On Being Human as Praxis
  • Author: Katherine McKittrick
  • ISBN: 9780822358206
  • Page: 386
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The Jamaican writer and cultural theorist Sylvia Wynter is best known for her diverse writings that pull together insights from theories in history, literature, science, and black studies, to explore race, the legacy of colonialism, and representations of humanness Sylvia Wynter On Being Human as Praxis is a critical genealogy of Wynter s work, highlighting her insightsThe Jamaican writer and cultural theorist Sylvia Wynter is best known for her diverse writings that pull together insights from theories in history, literature, science, and black studies, to explore race, the legacy of colonialism, and representations of humanness Sylvia Wynter On Being Human as Praxis is a critical genealogy of Wynter s work, highlighting her insights on how race, location, and time together inform what it means to be human The contributors explore Wynter s stunning reconceptualization of the human in relation to concepts of blackness, modernity, urban space, the Caribbean, science studies, migratory politics, and the interconnectedness of creative and theoretical resistances The collection includes an extensive conversation between Sylvia Wynter and Katherine McKittrick that delineates Wynter s engagement with writers such as Frantz Fanon, W E B DuBois, and Aim C saire, among others the interview also reveals the ever extending range and power of Wynter s intellectual project, and elucidates her attempts to rehistoricize humanness as praxis.

    Duke University Press Sylvia Wynter Sylvia Wynter On Being Human as Praxis is a critical genealogy of Wynter s work, highlighting her insights on how race, location, and time together inform what it means to be human The contributors explore Wynter s stunning reconceptualization of the human in relation to concepts of blackness, modernity, urban space, the Caribbean, science studies, migratory politics, and the Sylvia Wynter On Being Human as Praxis McKittrick Jan , Sylvia Wynter On Being Human as Praxis is a critical genealogy of Wynter s work, highlighting her insights on how race, location, and time together inform what it means to be human The contributors explore Wynter s stunning reconceptualization of the human in relation to concepts of blackness, modernity, urban space, the Caribbean, science studies, migratory politics, and the Sylvia Wynter On Being Human as Praxis by Katherine Dec , Sylvia Wynter On Being Human as Praxis is a critical genealogy of Wynters work, highlighting her insights Sylvia Wynter On Being Human as Praxis is a critical genealogy of Wynter s work, highlighting her insights on how race, location, and time together inform what it Sylvia Wynter On Being Human as Praxis Books Gateway Sylvia Wynter On Being Human as Praxis is a critical genealogy of Wynter s work, highlighting her insights on how race, location, and time together inform what it means to be human. Sylvia Wynter On Being Human as Praxis Kindle edition Sylvia Wynter On Being Human as Praxis is a critical genealogy of Wynter s work, highlighting her insights on how race, location, and time together inform what it means to be human The contributors explore Wynter s stunning reconceptualization of the human in relation to concepts of blackness, modernity, urban space, the Caribbean, science studies, migratory politics, and the

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    About "Katherine McKittrick"

      • Katherine McKittrick

        Katherine McKittrick is a professor in Gender Studies at Queen s University She is an academic and writer whose work focuses on black studies, cultural geography, anti colonial and diaspora studies, with an emphasis on the ways in which social justice emerges in black creative texts music, fiction, poetry, visual art While many scholars have researched the areas of North American, European, Caribbean, and African black geographies, McKittrick was the first scholar to put forth the interdisciplinary possibilities of black and black feminist geography, with an emphasis on embodied, creative and intellectual spaces engendered in the diaspora.McKittrick has a Ph.D in Women s Studies from York University she received her degree in 2004.Since 2005, she has been Professor in Gender Studies at Queen s University, with joint appointments in Cultural Studies and Geography She is currently Editor at Antipode A Radical Journal of Geography.McKittrick s work has focused on black feminist thought and cultural geography, as explored in her book Demonic Grounds Black Women and the Cartographies of Struggle 2006 The book has been reviewed in Gender, Place Culture, Southscapes Geographies of Race, Religion, Literature, Topia Canadian Journal of Cultural Studies and American Literature The book was followed by Black Geographies and the Politics of Place 2007 , which she co edited with Clyde Woods The book has been reviewed in Canadian Woman Studies.McKittrick s research draws on the areas of black studies, anti colonial studies, cultural geographies, and gender studies, and attends to the links between epistemological narratives and social justice Creative texts she analyzed include music, music making, poetry, visual art, and literature, while specifically looking at the works of Sylvia Wynter, Toni Morrison, bell hooks, Robbie McCauley, M NourbeSe Philip, Willie Bester, Nas, Octavia Butler, and Dionne Brand from


    343 Comments

    1. don't know what my damage is but i have the hardest time tracking down essays. i have this weird bibliocentric lock on my brain and all of wynter's most important work has tended toward individual and therefore for me elusive papers of canonic significance. i fucked up again because this not what i thought it was, not a booklength work authored by her but an anthology. imagine my irritation. however there probably isn't a better way to be introduced to wynter's thought than through the conversat [...]


    2. A challenging read written for an academic audience, this book engages the work of a number of Caribbean thinkers (especially Sylvia Wynter, for obvious reasons but notably Aimé Césaire and Frantz Fanon, among others).Making it through the second chapter (a lengthy "interview" between McKittrick and Wynter based on a series of written and spoken interactions) is a slog. Wynter's ideas there are complex and encompassing, but perseverance is rewarded in subsequent chapters written by other contr [...]


    3. Reading Wynter is like listening to a griot. Her words are startling and familiar, and they weave new perspectives from very old, taken-for-granted knowledge about 'Man', biology, economy, and society. It took re-reading her a number of times to get into the rhythm of her prose and to let the displacing effects of her arguments work their power on me. I didn't read all of the commentary essays, but Mignolo's is fantastic. He ends his essay with a Wynter sentence that, he says (and I agree) sums [...]



    4. Katherine McKittrick’s edited volume on Sylvia Wynter is a must-read for scholars interested in philosophy, race, value-theory, and the question of the human. Prefaced by an engrossing seventy-five page “conversation” (it’s really just Sylvia Wynter responding to a series of questions by McKittrick), the book brings together establish Black studies scholars to discuss core concepts/recurring motifs in Sylvia Wynter’s work. The essays themselves are designated to help scholars studying [...]




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