Music, in a Foreign Language

Music, in a Foreign Language

Andrew Crumey / Jan 23, 2020

Music in a Foreign Language Two people meet on a train the young man is imagining a novel and imagining the life of the young woman A waiter rushes out to find a girl he fancied who hasn t paid her bill only to find a diary in

  • Title: Music, in a Foreign Language
  • Author: Andrew Crumey
  • ISBN: 9781873982112
  • Page: 488
  • Format: Paperback
  • Two people meet on a train the young man is imagining a novel, and imagining the life of the young woman A waiter rushes out to find a girl he fancied who hasn t paid her bill, only to find a diary in which their fictitious flirtation is anatomised But the story actually begins with a man taking a leak after making love to his wife He has the inklings of a novel, but Two people meet on a train the young man is imagining a novel, and imagining the life of the young woman A waiter rushes out to find a girl he fancied who hasn t paid her bill, only to find a diary in which their fictitious flirtation is anatomised But the story actually begins with a man taking a leak after making love to his wife He has the inklings of a novel, but thoughts will keep intruding, with all their seductive possibilities The man on the train is living in an England that has decided, with characteristic diffidence and lack of fuss, that it no longer wants to live under a totalitarian regime which has lasted for 40 years I say totalitarian, but think of Brazil, a world of terribly genial tyranny, where officialdom tries so hard to be accommodating And Duncan has another story, one prompted by the memory of his father s car crashing down a slope As with all good postmodernist novels, the endless digressions are soothing than jarring Murrough O Brien in The Independent on Sunday The strikingly inventive structure of this novel allows the author to explore the similarities between fictions and history At any point, there are infinite possibilities for the way the story, a life, or the history of the world might progress The whole work is enjoyably unpredictable, and poses profound questions about the issues of motivation, choice and morality The Sunday Times A writer interested in inheriting the mantle of Perec and Kundera than Amis and Drabble Like much of the most interesting British fiction around at the moment, Music, in a Foreign Language is being published in paperback by a small independent publishing house, giving hope that a tentative but long overdue counter attack is being mounted on the indelible conservatism of the modern English novel.With this novel he has begun his own small stand against cultural mediocrity, and to set himself up, like his hero, as a refugee from drabness From tinned peas, and rain Jonathan Coe in The Guardian

    • Free Download [Spirituality Book] Ó Music, in a Foreign Language - by Andrew Crumey ✓
      488 Andrew Crumey
    • thumbnail Title: Free Download [Spirituality Book] Ó Music, in a Foreign Language - by Andrew Crumey ✓
      Posted by:Andrew Crumey
      Published :2019-02-10T22:18:22+00:00

    About "Andrew Crumey"

      • Andrew Crumey

        Andrew Crumey pronounced Croomy has a PhD in theoretical physics and is former literary editor of Scotland on Sunday His novels combine history, philosophy, science and humour, and have been praised and translated worldwide He won the 60,000 Northern Rock Foundation Writers Award, the UK s largest literary prize, for his most recent novel Sputnik Caledonia It was also shortlisted for the James Tait Black Memorial Prize and Scottish Book of the Year, and longlisted for the Arthur C Clarke Award His 1994 debut novel, Music, in a Foreign Language, won the Saltire First Book Award and was longlisted for the Guardian Fiction Prize Pfitz was a New York Times Notable Book, and D Alembert s Principle was called in for the Booker Prize Mr Mee was longlisted for both the Booker Prize and IMPAC Award and won a Scottish Arts Council book award Mobius Dick was a finalist for the Commonwealth Writers Prize and was chosen by Waterstones for its alternative Booker shortlist Other prizes include an Arts Council Writer s Award and Northern Arts Writer s Award Born in Scotland in 1961, he grew up in Kirkintilloch and graduated with first class honours from St Andrews University He moved to London in 1983 to do a PhD on dynamical systems and infinite dimensional algebras at Imperial College Between 1986 and 1989 he was director of West London Nightline and care worker with Westminster Mencap, then returned to research, doing post doctoral work on nonlinear systems at Imperial College and Leeds University In 1992 he moved to Newcastle upon Tyne where he still lives with his wife and two children and worked as a schoolteacher for four years He became a regular book reviewer for Scotland on Sunday in 1996 and was literary editor from 2000 to 2006 He has written for the Guardian, Independent, Telegraph, Financial Times and other newspapers, regularly appears at literary scientific festivals and conferences, and teaches creative writing through seminars, workshops and mentoring His leisure interests include astronomy, fly fishing and classical piano.


    929 Comments

    1. An ordered first novel, this is a 3.5 star effort. It is also mild and polite. The novel concerns political oppression and betrayal in an alternate historical 20C where the UK is subject to a Stalinist regime. The previous two sentences create a tension. Victory gin can help with that. Two of the characters play duets --which makes for brighter mornings. There's a car crash and a great deal of sitting on trains.There's a good deal of meta reframing going along: found notebooks, the germ of a nov [...]


    2. “…by taking any particular course of action, one denies and loses for ever all the other paths along which one could have ventured. Sad, that life should have to be a gradual pruning of that great tree of possibilities, until one is left with a single trunk, leading to a single branch, and a single twig on the end of which one’s life reaches its ultimate conclusion.”So in this novel Andrew Crumey commences to multiply the number of possibilities… A character wants to write a story in w [...]


    3. Τι σου είναι αυτός ο άνθρωπος λοιπόν!!!! Ταλαντούχος πολύ, ομολογώ! Ότι έχω διαβάσει( όλα σχεδόν) εξίσου υπέροχα, εκκεντρικά, ιδιόρρυθμα, φανταστικά. Τελειώνει το βιβλίο, εξηγείς τα πάντα μέσα σου, ικανοποιημένος, σαν την στιγμή της απόλυτης διαύγειας και μετά μυριάδες σκέψει [...]


    4. it seemed as if this was 3 books in 1. and autobiography of the author, an unrelated story of a train ride, and the only plot i liked: the speculative fiction. wad a little disappointing by the end. i skipped many chapters that were outside the speculative fiction side of things (which i usually never do)


    5. Dit boek is het prijswinnend debuut van Andrew Crumey, een relatief onbekende Schotse auteur, die echter in Groot-Brittannië een goede pers heeft. En het is een mooi debuut. Hij ontleent veel aan Borges, Kundera en Calvino, schrijvers waarvan ik hou. En hij hanteert ook een vrij experimentele wijze van vertellen, waar ik ook nogal van hou. Liefhebbers van realistische verhalen met kop en staart kunnen Crumey beter vermijden, maar liefhebbers van omwegen, zijpaden, gedachte-experimenten, puzzels [...]


    6. This novel was very intriguing to me, because it makes some allusions to certain events that did not happen. That the allusions are made assuming that they were real events and that everyone should know them. The author wants to convince the readers that England was under German occupation during World War II and that afterward a communism regime ruled Great Britain. At a point of time I thought that the translator of the book did some mistake or that there is a typo. After encountering the same [...]


    7. A compelling, quirky read. Multiple stories intertwined gradually converge. But I felt it faded towards the end, becoming more conventional, something I would not have said if the feel of the early chapters had been maintained. Very enjoyable and I think worth revisiting. A lot of layers, maybe more than I was able to grasp in a first quick read.


    8. I absolutely loved this book, but I'm not really sure why. It's a little confusing, and sometimes annoying how Crumey--or the fictional author character--repeats himself, but at the same time it's reassuring. It obviously says a lot about the writing process, which is probably why I liked it so much. It says a lot about possibility, about changing. I don't know, I just really enjoyed it.


    9. I'm kind of surprised that I am giving this book 4 stars. It took me forever to finish and for most of the first half, I felt like I was walking through deep mud. The second half really surprised me, though. And by the last third, I was in love with it.A very interesting (and at times, difficult) read.


    10. Certainly not an easy or readily accessible book so hard to explain what made it such a shatteringly grand reading experience. The right timing? The right mood? Whatever it was, this book filled that reading moment perfectly.


    11. wonderful book set in a totalitarian Britain. well written, plots put together with some intricacy. about love, and thought, and memory, and the cyclical nature of the world.


    12. I tend to lean toward books having to do with Music or Life in Italy, and this had both. It was good, but I think I was sort of expecting more from it.


    13. A story of academia and a friendship built on music. Too often, however, the unusual form seems to hinder more than help and otherwise interesting themes get bogged down by heavy re-structuring.




    Leave a Reply