The Internal Magic of Activision Dragster:Volume Two of David Crane's Technical Wizardry Series

The Internal Magic of Activision Dragster:Volume Two of David Crane's Technical Wizardry Series

DavidCrane / Nov 20, 2019

The Internal Magic of Activision Dragster Volume Two of David Crane s Technical Wizardry Series The Atari Video Computer System started it all There were other early game systems but the Atari VCS also known as the was the first commercially successful programmable home game player Then al

  • Title: The Internal Magic of Activision Dragster:Volume Two of David Crane's Technical Wizardry Series
  • Author: DavidCrane
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 201
  • Format: ebook
  • The Atari Video Computer System started it all There were other early game systems, but the Atari VCS also known as the 2600 was the first commercially successful programmable home game player.Then along came Activision the first third party video game cartridge publisher Founded by unappreciated Atari game designers, Activision greatly expanded the state of the artThe Atari Video Computer System started it all There were other early game systems, but the Atari VCS also known as the 2600 was the first commercially successful programmable home game player.Then along came Activision the first third party video game cartridge publisher Founded by unappreciated Atari game designers, Activision greatly expanded the state of the art of programming for the 2600.Activision s first video game, Dragster , is a perfect example of this We all know by now that the Atari 2600 was designed to display two 8 bit objects like the tanks in the Combat cartridge So how is it that Dragster can have two 48 bit wide, smoothly moving objects on the screen The Technical Wizardry Series includes a number of interactive volumes featuring hands on illustrations to explain the many techniques used to turn the lowly Atari 2600 game system into the most versatile gaming platform of the last century.Volume Two explains the extremely obscure technical tricks invented to make a game like Dragster possible Later volumes explore other popular 2600 games and how the simple video circuitry of the system was manipulated to make those much complex games possible.

    • è The Internal Magic of Activision Dragster:Volume Two of David Crane's Technical Wizardry Series || ó PDF Download by ç DavidCrane
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      Posted by:DavidCrane
      Published :2019-08-22T09:51:57+00:00

    About "DavidCrane"

      • DavidCrane

        David Patrick Crane born 1953 in Nappanee, Indiana, United States is a video game designer and programmer.Crane originally worked in the field of hardware design for National Semiconductor Crane started his programming career at Atari, making games for the Atari 2600 He also worked on the operating system for the Atari 800 computer After meeting co worker Alan Miller in a tennis game, Miller told Crane about a plan he had to leave Atari and found a company that would give game designers recognition From this meeting, Crane left Atari in 1979 and co founded Activision, along with Miller, Jim Levy, Bob Whitehead, and Larry Kaplan His games won many awards while he was at Activision At Activision, he was best known as the designer of Pitfall Pitfall was a huge hit, and maintained the top slot on the Billboard charts for 64 weeks and was named video game of the year in 1982 Over 4 million copies of the game were sold in the 1980s It was the second best selling game for the Atari 2600 after Pac Man.Crane maintained that the Atari policy of relying on mangled adaptations of arcade games would result in a glut of cheap, unappealing games, which became one of the contributing factors to the Video Game Crash of 1983 He believed instead that tailoring new games to the strengths and weaknesses of the 2600 machine would have yielded positive results The reasoning was that while the new games would have lacked the instant promotion of an already known name, word of mouth among video gamers, being a young and highly social group, would have gradually made up for it if the game was good.In 1986, Crane left Activision to co found Absolute Entertainment with Garry Kitchen The two of them left mainly because of Jim Levy s departure, and the way the newly appointed CEO of Activision, Bruce Davis, treated video games like commodities rather than creative products Although Absolute was based in New Jersey, Crane did all of his programming at his home in California With Absolute, he was known for David Crane s Amazing Tennis and A Boy and His Blob Trouble on Blobolonia, a successful NES title following the adventures of the protagonist and his companion, a shape shifting blob In 1995, Absolute Entertainment was dissolved.In 1995, Crane co founded Skyworks Technologies as the organization s Chief Technical Officer.


    649 Comments

    1. An outstanding inside look at the tricks behind writing code for the Atari 2600. Some understanding of 6502 assembly is helpful.


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