Pride and Prometheus

Pride and Prometheus

John Kessel / Aug 19, 2019

Pride and Prometheus Pride and Prejudice meets Frankenstein as Mary Bennet falls for the enigmatic Victor Frankenstein and befriends his monstrous Creature in this clever fusion of two popular classics Threatened with des

  • Title: Pride and Prometheus
  • Author: John Kessel
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 170
  • Format: None
  • Pride and Prejudice meets Frankenstein as Mary Bennet falls for the enigmatic Victor Frankenstein and befriends his monstrous Creature in this clever fusion of two popular classics.Threatened with destruction unless he fashions a wife for his Creature, Victor Frankenstein travels to England where he meets Mary and Kitty Bennet, the remaining unmarried sisters of the BennetPride and Prejudice meets Frankenstein as Mary Bennet falls for the enigmatic Victor Frankenstein and befriends his monstrous Creature in this clever fusion of two popular classics.Threatened with destruction unless he fashions a wife for his Creature, Victor Frankenstein travels to England where he meets Mary and Kitty Bennet, the remaining unmarried sisters of the Bennet family from Pride and Prejudice As Mary and Victor become increasingly attracted to each other, the Creature looks on impatiently, waiting for his bride But where will Victor find a female body from which to create the monster s mate Meanwhile, the awkward Mary hopes that Victor will save her from approaching spinsterhood while wondering what dark secret he is keeping from her.Pride and Prometheus fuses the gothic horror of Mary Shelley with the Regency romance of Jane Austen in an exciting novel that combines two age old stories in a fresh and startling way.

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      Posted by:John Kessel
      Published :2019-05-08T13:12:22+00:00

    About "John Kessel"

      • John Kessel

        John Joseph Vincent Kessel co directs the creative writing program at North Carolina State University in Raleigh A winner of the Nebula, Locus, Sturgeon, and Tiptree Awards, his books include Good News From Outer Space, Corrupting Dr Nice, The Pure Product, and The Baum Plan for Financial Independence and Other Stories His story collection Meeting in Infinity was a New York Times Notable Book Most recently, with James Patrick Kelly he has edited the anthologies Feeling Very Strange, Rewired, The Secret History of Science Fiction and Kafkaesque Born in Buffalo, NY, Kessel has a PhD in American Literature, has been an NEA Fellow, and for twenty years has been one of the organizers of the Syca Hill Writers Workshop.


    716 Comments

    1. 4.5 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum bibliosanctum/2018/02/12/Admittedly, I’m not so big a fan of Jane Austen or Austen-inspired fiction that I would normally pick up any book with a title that begins with “Pride and…”, but there was just something irresistible about John Kessel’s novel that called to me. Of course, the added element of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein didn’t hurt. Still, although it may draw inspiration from one of two of the most beloved novels of classic literature, i [...]


    2. One glimpse of the blurb telling me that this was a mash-up of Jane Austen's Pride & Prejudice and Mary Shelley's Frankenstein and I had to read it. Two powerhouse classics with vastly different settings and atmosphere had me so curious about how the author would pull it off.I confess to a little trepidation, as well. Both are powerful stories with different themes so I was crossing my fingers that one would not suffer at the expense to the other.Well, never fear, the author had a different [...]


    3. I have to give a lot of credit, in a way, to an author who decides to write a sequel to a classic novel (much less two). It's a gutsy thing to do, and risky, which I think is why I keep trying them – although, honestly, I'm hard-pressed to think of one that has actually been really good. You have to imagine Mr. Kessel telling people he was putting out a sequel to not only Frankenstein but – brace yourself – Pride and Prejudice. It's crazy. It's crazy enough that it might work: mad gambles [...]


    4. (Disclaimer: I received this free book from the publisher. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.)I have always been fascinated with these two stories in different ways. Frankenstein was the first time I ever read about a 'cyborg'. I always felt bad for Mary from Pride and Prejudice. The plot was wonderful, not only because it was a retelling, but it retained the original backbones of the stories, while bringing a pretty strong grasp of what ways it would deviate. Kessel b [...]


    5. Very well written, yes, but surely there's more to a work of art than that. I enjoyed reading this novelette, but the entire time I expected; hoped that this Hugo award nominee would produce some entirely new view, a modern view of the nature of creation. Instead nothing to write home about; in fact I have already expended far too many words on this review.


    6. Elizabeth is of course the Bennet sister I have always wanted to resemble; Mary is the one I have feared resembling. I have always been intrigued by fiction that posits a way for her to have some sort of happy ending. This exploration pairs her with Victor Frankenstein.Kessel's portrait of Mary struck me as realistic but empathetic: time has made her less of a prig, but she's still foolish and naive in many ways. The Creature is also sympathetically portrayed, though his monstrous actions not co [...]


    7. I received this book for free from the Publicist in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.The nitty-gritty: A highly inventive mash-up of Pride and Prejudice and Frankenstein, told in pitch perfect prose that evokes the styles of both Jane Austen and Mary Shelley.What do you get when you take two beloved classics, one gothic and one romantic, and mash them together? In this case, you get a fascinating tale of what might happen if [...]


    8. This review and others posted over at my blog.I received this book for free from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. Arriving in time for the 200th anniversary of Shelley’s Frankenstein, this mash-up of classics follows Mary Bennet (of Pride and Prejudice fame) as she meets the mysterious Victor Frankenstein at a party. After running into him a few times, she learns his dark secret and meets the monster he’s created. Giving man and monster the benefit of the doubt, Mary hopes the [...]


    9. OyeI mean, I shouldn't be surprised because I knew this book was going to be terrible or excellent. Turns out it's the latter.The few, very few, things I enjoyed were Mary's perspective because I had sympathy for her. It was interesting to hear the events from "Pride and Prejudice" from Mary's perspective, but yeahat's it.It was trying too hard. Too much obvious symbolism. Too much "hit you over the head and beat you with a stick so you understand my messaging". WE GET IT! He's Prometheus and de [...]



    10. Really, really well done! If you are a fan of Pride and Prejudice and/or Mary Shelley's Frankenstein you will take great pleasure in this novel that combines the two so that Mary Bennett becomes the prime character in pursuit of Victor Frankenstein's love and regard. Throughout one must question what makes a person human and what defines a monster. Can't wait for this to publish!


    11. *Free copy for an honest review.I have to admit, between this book and Under the Pendulum Sun, I may have to start reading more gothic fantasy/sci-fi. I thoroughly enjoyed this book. I was a big fan of the original books as well as several of their adaptations (seriously, Pride, Prejudice & Zombies was awesome!) so I happily requested a copy of this book. I was not disappointed in any way.I greatly appreciate Kessel's ability to combine these very different styles in such a way that they sti [...]


    12. The nitty-gritty: A highly inventive mash-up of Pride and Prejudice and Frankenstein, told in pitch perfect prose that evokes the styles of both Jane Austen and Mary Shelley.What do you get when you take two beloved classics, one gothic and one romantic, and mash them together? In this case, you get a fascinating tale of what might happen if Mary Bennet from Pride and Prejudice and Victor Frankenstein from Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein were to meet. The result was what I expected in some cases, [...]


    13. “It showed that people could convince themselves of things that, in a sober moment, they would recognize were not true.”Pride and Prometheus is the delightful combination of two beloved classics: Jane Austin’s Pride & Prejudice with Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. While it may seem difficult to imagine how the two stories could merge, John Kessel makes the marriage between the two merge seamlessly. The transition happens so easily that it isn’t difficult to imagine this is the natural [...]


    14. First off I got this copy of “Pride and Prometheus” for free in exchange for a review This review is MOSTLY Spoiler-free so read at your own riskTo be honest I still feel like I need time to process it all (and that’s not a bad thing). I’ll admit right now that I’ve never read the book “Frankenstein“ by Mary Shelley but that didn’t stop me from reading the short story (which I read because Mary Bennet is my favorite character from "Pride and Prejudice”) I felt I had to see what [...]


    15. I liked the premise of this and it was a fun read. But this didn't live up to my expectations. I love the language and banter of Austen's Pride and Prejudice and the dialogue here falls short. At times Kessel describes the same incident from the points-of-view of two, sometimes three, characters, which seems repetitious and tedious. (view spoiler)[ The ending seems rushed and I would have preferred that, rather than spend two, sometimes three, chapters telling the same incident from differing po [...]


    16. This was interesting. The merging of Pride and Prejudice and Frankenstein worked better than expected. However, I think Kessel got some of the characterization of Austen's wrong. I read this for a book club so want to hear what other's think.


    17. Thanks Saga Press and netgalley for this ARC.Mary and Victor make the perfect foils for each other. Loved and didn't want this book to end. You'll be rooting for them both, raging at history and society, and knowing that nothing is black and white at the end.


    18. It stuck true to the plots and read very much like Pride & Prejudice and Frankenstein. It wasn't exactly like what I was expecting but it was a clever tale.


    19. Pride and Prometheus is a clever combining of two classic stories. While I have never encountered John Kessel’s writing before, I found his voice perfectly suited for the kind of tale.As a lover of classic literature, I can see this book as bringing entertainment to fellow bibliophiles. I can also see this book as being an interesting additional course reading when studying Jane Austen, Mary Shelley, or both authors.Interesting book — I’m glad I read it.



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