Fun City: John Lindsay, Joe Namath, and How Sports Saved New York in the 1960s

Fun City: John Lindsay, Joe Namath, and How Sports Saved New York in the 1960s

Sean Deveney / Jan 18, 2020

Fun City John Lindsay Joe Namath and How Sports Saved New York in the s On January New York came to a standstill as the city s transit workers went on strike This was the first day on the job for Mayor John Lindsay a handsome young former congressman with presid

  • Title: Fun City: John Lindsay, Joe Namath, and How Sports Saved New York in the 1960s
  • Author: Sean Deveney
  • ISBN: 9781613218150
  • Page: 257
  • Format: Hardcover
  • On January 1, 1966, New York came to a standstill as the city s transit workers went on strike This was the first day on the job for Mayor John Lindsay a handsome, young former congressman with presidential aspirations and he would approach the issue with an unconventional outlook that would be his hallmark He ignored the cold and walked four miles, famously declaring, On January 1, 1966, New York came to a standstill as the city s transit workers went on strike This was the first day on the job for Mayor John Lindsay a handsome, young former congressman with presidential aspirations and he would approach the issue with an unconventional outlook that would be his hallmark He ignored the cold and walked four miles, famously declaring, I still think it is a fun city As profound social, racial, and cultural change sank the city into repeated crises, critics lampooned Lindsay s fun city Yet for all the hard times the city endured during and after his tenure as mayor, there was indeed fun to be had Against this backdrop, too, the sporting scene saw tremendous upheaval.On one hand, the venerable Yankees who had won 15 pennants in an 18 year span before 1965 and the NFL s powerhouse Giants suddenly went into a level of decline neither had known for generations, as stars like Mickey Mantle and Whitey Ford on the diamond and Y.A Tittle on the gridiron aged quickly But on the other, the fall of the city s sports behemoths was accompanied by the rise of anti establishment outsiders there were Joe Namath and the Jets, as well as the shocking triumph of the Amazin Mets, who won the 1969 World Series after spending the franchise s first eight seasons in the cellar Meanwhile, the city s two overlooked franchises, the Knicks and Rangers, also had breakthroughs, bringing new life to Madison Square Garden.The overlap of these two worlds in the 1960s Lindsay s politics and the reemerging sports landscape serves as the backbone of Fun City In the vein of Ladies and Gentlemen The Bronx is Burning, the book tells the story of a remarkable and thrilling time in New York sports against the backdrop of a remarkable and often difficult time for the city, culturally and socially The late sixties was an era in which New York toughened up in a lot of ways it also was an era in which a changing of the guard among New York pro teams led the way in making it a truly fun city.Skyhorse Publishing, as well as our Sports Publishing imprint, are proud to publish a broad range of books for readers interested in sports books about baseball, pro football, college football, pro and college basketball, hockey, or soccer, we have a book about your sport or your team.Whether you are a New York Yankees fan or hail from Red Sox nation whether you are a die hard Green Bay Packers or Dallas Cowboys fan whether you root for the Kentucky Wildcats, Louisville Cardinals, UCLA Bruins, or Kansas Jayhawks whether you route for the Boston Bruins, Toronto Maple Leafs, Montreal Canadiens, or Los Angeles Kings we have a book for you While not every title we publish becomes a New York Times bestseller or a national bestseller, we are committed to publishing books on subjects that are sometimes overlooked by other publishers and to authors whose work might not otherwise find a home.

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      Posted by:Sean Deveney
      Published :2019-03-07T18:03:01+00:00

    About "Sean Deveney"

      • Sean Deveney

        Sean Deveney Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Fun City: John Lindsay, Joe Namath, and How Sports Saved New York in the 1960s book, this is one of the most wanted Sean Deveney author readers around the world.


    326 Comments

    1. Fun City by Sean Deveney is a great book that lands squarely on two of my favorite subjects, the 1960s and New York City. Very similar in structure and subject to Jonathan Mahler's Ladies and Gentlemen, The Bronx is Burning. But whereas Mahler was writing about the Summer of '77, the blackout, Son of Sam and the Yankees world series race, Deveney writes about the '69 Mets, Joe Namath and Super Bowl III, Mayor Lindsay and the Vietnam war protests. Although the culmination of the book is the year [...]


    2. New York Sports and Politics in late 60's"Fun City" was a great book about New York in the late 60's. The book threads through the Championship seasons of the Jets, Mets and Knicks as well as the mayorship of John Lindsay. Highly recommended


    3. "Fun City" ends with a great quote from famed New York writer Jimmy Breslin from 1969, "When you live in fires and funerals and strikes and rats and crowds and people screaming in the night, sports is the only thing that makes any sense."Following the rise of liberal Republican mayor John Lindsay, Alabama star QB Joe Namath landing with the upstart Jets of the AFL, Tom Seaver and the Mets, and the rise of New York Knicks, culminating with all three of those franchises winning a championship in a [...]


    4. Lindsay, Namath, Seaver, Reed. New York City - Fun City - in the 60s. What a great book! Why great? Well-written with the right hard edge a book about NYC must have. Also, I was a tween and early teen coming of age not far from the City in the 60s. I lived all of this: Lindsay getting buried by snow, Namath wearing a fur coat, Seaver pitching perfectly, Reed walking onto the court in game seven. I remember listening to the Mets on my transistor radio as they won their way to the Series champions [...]


    5. I did like it. Nice connections--and also connections not pushed on you--between John Lindsay, the Mets and Joe Namath (with drop-ins from the Rangers and Knicks). But somebody there doesn't know middle-school punctuation; about 2/3 of the time, they would punctuate a quotation, ANY quotation, with a comma: Namath's friends said that he was, "really a good guy." I mean, come on. It made me so irritated I almost could not finish.


    6. A fast moving account of 1969s New York intertwined with professional sports. I come away from this book feeling that pro sports are more about money and individual egos than a team. The 60s had crime, despair and tension not just in New York but nationwide but for the times you could watch sports it took you away. Although I want born yet I certainly was able to get that feeling that pro sports have a place in this country whether in financial crisis or political crisis.


    7. What a great book! I lived through most of this, in Queens, NY, & it brought back memories I haven't thought about in years. I was in the Army for the beginning of the tale, but the rest became vivid, once again. This is thanks to the author's attention to most details, & his prose. Like all worthwhile history books, it reads like the best fiction.


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