BiblioTech: Why Libraries Matter More Than Ever in the Age of Google

BiblioTech: Why Libraries Matter More Than Ever in the Age of Google

John Palfrey / Feb 21, 2020

BiblioTech Why Libraries Matter More Than Ever in the Age of Google Libraries today are important than ever More than just book repositories libraries can become bulwarks against some of the most crucial challenges of our age unequal access to education jobs and in

  • Title: BiblioTech: Why Libraries Matter More Than Ever in the Age of Google
  • Author: John Palfrey
  • ISBN: 9781494584726
  • Page: 159
  • Format: Audiobook
  • Libraries today are important than ever More than just book repositories, libraries can become bulwarks against some of the most crucial challenges of our age unequal access to education, jobs, and information.In BiblioTech, educator and technology expert John Palfrey argues that anyone seeking to participate in the 21st century needs to understand how to find and uLibraries today are important than ever More than just book repositories, libraries can become bulwarks against some of the most crucial challenges of our age unequal access to education, jobs, and information.In BiblioTech, educator and technology expert John Palfrey argues that anyone seeking to participate in the 21st century needs to understand how to find and use the vast stores of information available online And libraries, which play a crucial role in making these skills and information available, are at risk In order to survive our rapidly modernizing world and dwindling government funding, libraries must make the transition to a digital future as soon as possible by digitizing print material and ensuring that born digital material is publicly available online.Not all of these changes will be easy for libraries to implement But as Palfrey boldly argues, these modifications are vital if we hope to save libraries and, through them, the American democratic ideal.

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      Published :2019-08-06T14:41:10+00:00

    About "John Palfrey"

      • John Palfrey

        John Palfrey Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the BiblioTech: Why Libraries Matter More Than Ever in the Age of Google book, this is one of the most wanted John Palfrey author readers around the world.


    984 Comments

    1. This is a good overview of the state of libraries in America. I heard the author speak about the future of libraries at a conference, and decided to check out his book. Bibliotech makes the argument that libraries are still a valuable part of the community and need to be supported, but they also need to continue to grow and adapt with the times.As a librarian, I'm passionate about supporting libraries and appreciate all of the services they provide to the public. One of Palfrey's special project [...]


    2. Not a good way to start out the new year. While I agree with the message, it was too wordy & redundant. The introduction took 3o minutes & repeated points half a dozen times & then the first chapter began by repeating points already covered in the introduction.Libraries are more important than ever, but people don't see them for what they really are. They're historical repositories & important for allowing everyone access to information freely, no matter what their economic statu [...]


    3. An insightful, thought-provoking, and intelligent rallying cry for all who either work, love, or have an interest in the future of libraries. HIGHEST POSSIBLE RECOMMENDATION


    4. This could have been a much better book.Ultimately, I didn't know who the intended audience was. Was it a book intended to inspire librarians with all the new and exciting pathways they can and should continue to develop in their libraries? Okay, then perhaps include case studies, illustrating especially how to innovate with no money.Or is the audience philanthropists, or politicians, the people who can actually control the nightmare budget crises that are facing libraries? In which case, leave [...]


    5. If you have more than a passing interest in reading books and have grown up knowing what a good library is, this is a book you should be looking at. If you haven’t, well, you need to discover what you are missing…Despite Google being infinitely more powerful and more responsive than a traditional library, there is still something to be said about a library, staffed by professional librarians, that we should not throw away and lose. Clearly libraries need to keep up with the digital world, th [...]


    6. Originally published at Reading RealityThis week is National Library Week, so it seemed logical to review a book about libraries. Not just because I am a librarian, but because I believe that libraries are important to our future as a democratic society.BiblioTech attempts to answer a question that most librarians and library workers face multiple times in any given month: whether libraries are still relevant in an age where any information an average person (or library user) might desire ostens [...]


    7. John Palfrey channels passion and desire in making his case as to why libraries are relevant and more needed in this age of Google then ever. He works on presenting a rational, yet passionate plea for the role libraries played in America's past and the part he thinks it needs to play in the present and future for the betterment of society.Palfrey provides a list of what he considers the problems facing today's libraries: public use (and understanding of libraries); physical space versus virtual [...]


    8. I have seen Palfrey speak a few times and, lest I sound to grouchy, I appreciate his ideas and devotion to libraries. Perhaps because I was familiar with the evolution of DPLA and Palfrey's work at Harvard, much of this book felt like preaching to the choir. The need to keep knowledge creation in noncommercial spaces, library as platform, the print-plus-digital age are all very important - but how do we get the average library user interested in reading this book and exploring these ideas? Who i [...]


    9. An interesting look at modern libraries and the changes we need to make to survive. As a librarian, I see every day the number of people coming into the library with less than desirable technology skills and how it is causing issues in many parts of their lives. From ebooks to online databases, remote learning, digitizing local history, libraries are having to quickly adapt to the new ways of getting information to their patrons while at the same time being a community space.This book has some e [...]


    10. I wanted this book to be so much more. Instead, I didn't understand who the audience was supposed to be. I was annoyed at the run-of-the-mill suggestions. I lost a lot of patience because of his "should" "must" "ought" usage. I thought he disregarded low income and rural population. He plugged DPLA too much and seemed to think paper was going to disappear at some future stage entirely. And I noticed his blatant lack of concern toward how libraries are supposed to fund any of these changes. Whate [...]


    11. This book supports a lot of what I have brought up when concerned about the direction of libraries, archives, museums, etc when funding is scares and technology is taking over in many ways. I felt that this book could have been shorter to help with how overly repetitive it was to get his message across.



    12. Preaching to the choir. Good examples of current initiatives and ideas for the future, but could have been 1/4-1/2 the length and gotten the same points across.


    13. "The knowledge that libraries offer and the help that librarians provide are the lifeblood of an informed and engaged republic" (Palfrey, page 10).


    14. Thank you. Thank you for this book. Thank you for writing a book that so many people need to read to understand what libraries and librarians are going through, what obstacles we face on a daily basis. The money we need to become better . Everyone needs to read this book and do their part in helping us transform our libraries into the current and future centuries.


    15. I will make this short because my relationship with this book is really uncomplicated in so far as there's not really anything here I disagree with. Points off for other stuff though: this book could have easily been an essay length piece for sure. There's a lot of stuff here that's not earth shattering for a library employee to read, so let me just tell you the elements I agreed with *most of all*. (1) The library as a public option for information and the importance of not leaving cultural end [...]


    16. It is a fact that libraries are not as popular as they used to be. The increase in digital technology and our reliance on digital formats to provide us with information has left libraries high on the list of government's budget cuts. This book not only details this unfortunate trend, but also explains why libraries are more than just a place to borrow books.The author proves himself at the beginning to be highly qualified in discussing libraries and their role in a digital age. He was the former [...]


    17. BiblioTech was a fascinating read. It nicely summed up the average mental image of a library that a community member may have, shrouded in all its nostalgia, and then spent a bit of the book depicting why such nostalgia, though useful and quaint, is rather damaging to libraries moving into the modern age. The author is a "feral" or a non-librarian who works at the library, and he plays upon the pitfalls of our current library system- the aggressive competition with for-profit industries, the com [...]


    18. This is an important book. John Palfrey has been part of several important information initiatives (the Digital Public Library, the Berkman Centre, the library at Harvard Law), and he brings all of this experience to bear in his analysis of the challenges and opportunities facing libraries. My copy is scattered with post-its of things I want to draw to the attention of my colleagues, such as:" major library systems will need to continue their role as stewards of distinct materials rather than as [...]


    19. I just reread this. Preaching to the choir for me, but highly recommended for anyone who wants an overview of what's going on with libraries—which should be everyone, honestly, because libraries are going to be what saves the shreds of civilization in this country. I'm serious about that. There are very few institutions left that have the power to bridge the enormously iniquitous gap that exists, and to power through the rampant anti-intellectualism that's taking hold; libraries can do that, b [...]


    20. I couldn't finish this book. He points out in the Introduction that librarians will be angry that he doesnt give credit for the things they are already doing in libraries. And he is right. I can only read that libraries "aren't merely book depositories anymore" so many times. He isn't saying anything that isn't already being said by forward-thinking librarians. And I don't know that the general public will care about this book at all. So what is the point?


    21. Simply didn't hold my attention. I appreciated Palfrey's straightforward attitude, which seemed more practical and less cheerleader-y than some pro-library writing, but there wasn't enough content to justify the length of the book. By page 120 I was seeing concepts repeated within the same paragraph and didn't feel the need to go further.


    22. Kinda preaching to the converted here but this was a worthwhile read. Libraries are, by and large, on the right track. The question is whether we will move quickly enough into the digital realm (while keeping one foot firmly planted in the analog universe) to remain relevant. My spidey sense says yes, we will. But it isn't going to be (and hasn't been) easy.


    23. Good information about how libraries should adapt in this digital age. The last chapter lists 10 specific steps that libraries should take to go forward and be successful in the future. Very interesting and lots to think about.


    24. I saw John Palfrey speak at ALA this year, and he expanded on his arguments there with this book. Written for the layperson, not a librarian, so much of this will seem obvious to librarians who've given some thought to the future, but still an important book.


    25. Enjoyable, not only for the content and it's relation to my current job, but also for Palfrey's passion, which is clearly present in his personal insights and perspectives concerning the future of libraries.



    26. Palfrey, J. (2015). BiblioTech: Why Libraries Matter More Than Ever in the Age of Google. New York, NY:Basic Books.John Palfrey, the former head of the Harvard Law School Library and the founding chairman of the Digital Public Library of America, believes that libraries are being left behind in the Stone Age. This is due in part by the technology that is being developed by the private sector and this technology is greatly influencing how people interact, create, and receive information. In his b [...]


    27. This review is cross-posted on my blog.Libraries have been around for a while and will go extinct if they do not adapt to modern society.That, in a nutshell, is the thesis of Biblio Tech. The author, John Palfrey, a law professor and library director discusses several factors that have changed the way we procure information. Most notable, and no surprise to anyone reading I’m sure, is the internet. The author comes down strong on the case that libraries can no longer be large storehouses for b [...]


    28. Reviewer bio:I am an academic librarian whose main responsibility has been to establish and maintain a large database for electronic reserves. I have a solid background in public service, and have mentored library school students and recent graduates for over 10 years. I am conversant in issues relating to access and technology relating to digitization of materials as well as those born-digitally. Since I follow library news on a daily basis, I read this book more as a review of the known, while [...]


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