How to Plan a Crusade: Reason and Religious War in the High Middle Ages

How to Plan a Crusade: Reason and Religious War in the High Middle Ages

Christopher Tyerman / Feb 16, 2020

How to Plan a Crusade Reason and Religious War in the High Middle Ages Wonderfully written and characteristically brilliant Peter Frankopan author of The Silk Roads Elegant readable an impressive synthesis Not many historians could have done it Jonathan Sumption Spect

  • Title: How to Plan a Crusade: Reason and Religious War in the High Middle Ages
  • Author: Christopher Tyerman
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 420
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Wonderfully written and characteristically brilliant Peter Frankopan, author of The Silk Roads Elegant, readable an impressive synthesis Not many historians could have done it Jonathan Sumption, Spectator Tyerman s book is fascinating not just for what it has to tell us about the Crusades, but for the mirror it holds up to today s religious extremism T Wonderfully written and characteristically brilliant Peter Frankopan, author of The Silk Roads Elegant, readable an impressive synthesis Not many historians could have done it Jonathan Sumption, Spectator Tyerman s book is fascinating not just for what it has to tell us about the Crusades, but for the mirror it holds up to today s religious extremism Tom Holland, SpectatorThousands left their homelands in the Middle Ages to fight wars abroad But how did the Crusades actually happen From recruitment propaganda to raising money, ships to siege engines, medicine to the power of prayer, this vivid, surprising history shows holy war and medieval society in a new light.

    • ↠ How to Plan a Crusade: Reason and Religious War in the High Middle Ages || ✓ PDF Read by ✓ Christopher Tyerman
      420 Christopher Tyerman
    • thumbnail Title: ↠ How to Plan a Crusade: Reason and Religious War in the High Middle Ages || ✓ PDF Read by ✓ Christopher Tyerman
      Posted by:Christopher Tyerman
      Published :2019-07-26T19:41:04+00:00

    About "Christopher Tyerman"

      • Christopher Tyerman

        British medieval historian, fellow of Hertford College, Oxford University.


    680 Comments

    1. This book came highly recommended and provides a wealth of valuable information for anyone interested in understanding the society that produced the crusades. Organized by topic rather than chronologically, it examines topics all too often ignored in more conventional histories from finance to health, safety and supply. Most important, it documents the immense amount of planning, coordination, organization and expense that went into mounting a massive military campaign across vast distances in t [...]


    2. Plenty of interesting nuggets, for someone like me interested in medieval crusades, but the book reads - as I assume it is - like expanded notes from a university lecture course, and I found it extremely dry in places.


    3. This book takes aim at the idea that the crusaders marched on faith alone. Tyerman argues instead that they were highly sophisticated enterprises that involved delicate financing, recruitment, and logistical efforts. He suggests that the crusaders need to be seen by their own points of reference but consistently uses ours. For example, he claims that the crusaders were not "idiots", and likens their planning and organization to modern war efforts. One wonders, though, if the image Tyerman invoke [...]


    4. I enjoyed this book, but it wasn't that easy a read. For some reason, it seems to have been marketed as an accessible history of the crusades, possibly picking up on the theme of a clash of civilisations (something the conclusion hints at); but whilst it is about the latter (albeit from an entirely Western-centric position) it isn't really the former. It probably sits more comfortably on the academic shelves and feels like exactly the sort of book I'd have read when I studied history at universi [...]


    5. Full of interesting details, but it does assume that you 1) know about all of the crusades and their major players 2) have at least a passing knowledge of medieval European politics between the 11th and 15th century.


    6. Christopher Tyerman’s How to Plan a Crusade is very much what the title tells you to expect. What was done before any of 300 years’ worth of Crusaders could get within sword’s point distance from any Sarasin, Lithuanian or whichever enemy was targeted. In general this is a readable analysis of the logistics, and recruiting of a crusading army. It is not for the general reader and there is a presumption that you have at least a basic background in the history of the various Crusades. Herein [...]


    7. I struggled a bit with this book. Probably because I know almost nothing about the crusades. That being said, this might be a good book to start with, but I can't say that with certainty since I'm not familiar with what else is available. This book does provide a good overview of how crusades worked, particularly focusing on the logistics. In this respect, the book is well researched and also very interesting.


    8. An excellent summary of the rational pursuit of the crusades. If like me, you are familiar with the history of the crusades, the major players and their successes and failures, this is a useful companion, providing much needed detail to complement traditional histories of battles and politics. But this is not for the beginning reader. I especially enjoyed the flashes of (very) dry wit that occasionally surfaced.


    9. I wanted to dig into the First Crusade and it was hard to pick out the few parts specific to that effort from the overall discussion of the other Crusades. And I found it dry and not too interesting.


    10. An excellent read detailing how the crusades were recruited for, equipped and carried out. Would recommend this to anyone looking for a level headed and always interesting account of what is often a very emotive subject.


    11. A scholarly work, well written and researched, and a 5 from that point of view. But it's best for researchers, not general readers, as the fundamental points--not many--are accompanied by an abundance of supporting evidence that's not always captivating to read.




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