Inspector French and the Cheyne Mystery

Inspector French and the Cheyne Mystery

Freeman Wills Crofts / Sep 15, 2019

Inspector French and the Cheyne Mystery When young Cheyne finds things going wrong and a dangerous gang of criminals unpleasantly interested in him he tries to outwit them on his own When things get serious and his life attempted he goes

  • Title: Inspector French and the Cheyne Mystery
  • Author: Freeman Wills Crofts
  • ISBN: 9781842323977
  • Page: 271
  • Format: Paperback
  • When young Cheyne finds things going wrong and a dangerous gang of criminals unpleasantly interested in him, he tries to outwit them on his own When things get serious and his life attempted, he goes to Scotland Yard French comes into the case, and carries out one of his usual investigations of untiring thoroughness directed by flashes of inspiration.In America known asWhen young Cheyne finds things going wrong and a dangerous gang of criminals unpleasantly interested in him, he tries to outwit them on his own When things get serious and his life attempted, he goes to Scotland Yard French comes into the case, and carries out one of his usual investigations of untiring thoroughness directed by flashes of inspiration.In America known as The Cheyne Mystery.

    • ☆ Inspector French and the Cheyne Mystery || ☆ PDF Download by Ç Freeman Wills Crofts
      271 Freeman Wills Crofts
    • thumbnail Title: ☆ Inspector French and the Cheyne Mystery || ☆ PDF Download by Ç Freeman Wills Crofts
      Posted by:Freeman Wills Crofts
      Published :2019-06-15T22:44:07+00:00

    About "Freeman Wills Crofts"

      • Freeman Wills Crofts

        Born in Dublin of English stock, Freeman Wills Crofts was educated at Methodist and Campbell Colleges in Belfast and at age 17 he became a civil engineering pupil, apprenticed to his uncle, Berkeley D Wise who was the chief engineer of the Belfast and Northern Counties Railway BNCR In 1899 he became a fully fledged railway engineer before becoming a district engineer and then chief assistant engineer for the BNCR.He married in 1912, Mary Bellas Canning, a bank manager s daughter His writing career began when he was recovering from a serious illness and his efforts were rewarded when his first novel The Cask was accepted for publication by a London publishing house Within two decades the book had sold 100,000 copies Thereafter he continued to write in his spare time and produced a book a year through to 1929 when he was obliged to stop working through poor health.When he and his wife moved to Guildford, England, he took up writing full time and not surprisingly many of his plots revolved around travel and transport, particularly transport timetables and many of them had a Guildford setting.In retirement from engineering, as well as writing, he also pursued his other interests, music, in which he was an organist and conductor, gardening, carpentry and travel.He wrote a mystery novel almost every year until his death and in addition he produced about 50 short stories, 30 radio plays for the BBC, a number of true crime works, a play, Sudden Death , a juvenile mystery, Young Robin Brand, Detective , and a religious work, The Four Gospels in One Story.His best known character is Inspector Joseph French, who featured in 30 detective novels between 1924 and 1957 And Raymond Chandler praised his plots, calling him the soundest builder of them all.Gerry WolstenholmeMay 2010


    775 Comments

    1. Inspector French and the Cheyne Mystery (which I never heard of) is a novel written by Freeman Wills Crofts (who I never heard of) and published in 1926. I read it because it is here. I was putting everything back to the various places they go when they are somewhere else at the Christmas season. This book wound up in a pile of books to return to the shelves. I don't know where it came from, but here it is. And since it was not put back in place yet, seeing as I couldn't remember where it was su [...]


    2. This is my least favourite of the Crofts I have read so far. I got really bogged down about one third in. As with others, it only took off for me when Inspector French became involved about halfway through.It was really a rather run-of-the mill adventure/mystery typical of the 1920's. Too many false starts-Cheyne is hoodwinked three times- for my liking.Plucky love interest thrown in. The cryptogram that really wasn't.The usual train timetables and some mucking around in boatsSeedy foreign going [...]


    3. A good book, especially because it was saved by Inspector French. Cheyne, the main character, falls three times by tricks played on him by the same people! I wanted to scream when he falls the third time, and knowing they were the same guys who had tricked him twice before! A little easy to figure the mystery, but still a very good read.


    4. Though it starts off rather slowly, setting the background, once it really gets started this book is hard to put down. Maxwell Cheyne leads a quiet life in the country, with his mother an sister. Then odd things begin happening to him, leading him to the adventure of a lifetime.



    5. Wow. Just as good as 'The Cask', Crofts' first book. Very difficult to put down; especially if you are a golden age mystery fan like me.


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