The Awkward Thoughts of W. Kamau Bell: Tales of a 6' 4", African American, Heterosexual, Cisgender, Left-Leaning, Asthmatic, Black and Proud Blerd, Mama's Boy, Dad, and Stand-Up Comedian

The Awkward Thoughts of W. Kamau Bell: Tales of a 6' 4", African American, Heterosexual, Cisgender, Left-Leaning, Asthmatic, Black and Proud Blerd, Mama's Boy, Dad, and Stand-Up Comedian

W. Kamau Bell / Aug 22, 2019

The Awkward Thoughts of W Kamau Bell Tales of a African American Heterosexual Cisgender Left Leaning Asthmatic Black and Proud Blerd Mama s Boy Dad and Stand Up Comedian You may know W Kamau Bell from his hit show on CNN Or maybe you ve read about him in The New York Times or The New Yorker about his intersectional progressivism gimmick he treats racial gay and wom

  • Title: The Awkward Thoughts of W. Kamau Bell: Tales of a 6' 4", African American, Heterosexual, Cisgender, Left-Leaning, Asthmatic, Black and Proud Blerd, Mama's Boy, Dad, and Stand-Up Comedian
  • Author: W. Kamau Bell
  • ISBN: 9781101985878
  • Page: 276
  • Format: Hardcover
  • You may know W Kamau Bell from his hit show on CNN Or maybe you ve read about him in The New York Times or The New Yorker, about his intersectional progressivism gimmick he treats racial, gay, and women s issues as inseparable.The Awkward Thoughts of W Kamau Bell is a humorous, well informed take on the world today, tackling a wide range of evergreen issues, such as raYou may know W Kamau Bell from his hit show on CNN Or maybe you ve read about him in The New York Times or The New Yorker, about his intersectional progressivism gimmick he treats racial, gay, and women s issues as inseparable.The Awkward Thoughts of W Kamau Bell is a humorous, well informed take on the world today, tackling a wide range of evergreen issues, such as race relations fatherhood the state of law enforcement today comedians and superheroes right wing politics failure his interracial marriage his upbringing by very strong willed, race conscious, yet ideologically opposite parents his early days struggling to find his comedic voice, then his later days struggling to find his comedic voice why he never seemed to fit in with the Black comedy scene or the white comedy scene how he was a Black nerd way before that became a thing how it took his wife and an East Bay lesbian to teach him that racism and sexism often walk hand in hand and much, much .

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    • thumbnail Title: [PDF] ↠ Free Read ☆ The Awkward Thoughts of W. Kamau Bell: Tales of a 6' 4", African American, Heterosexual, Cisgender, Left-Leaning, Asthmatic, Black and Proud Blerd, Mama's Boy, Dad, and Stand-Up Comedian : by W. Kamau Bell ✓
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      Published :2019-05-25T03:13:01+00:00

    About "W. Kamau Bell"

      • W. Kamau Bell

        W Kamau Bell is a socio political stand up comedian and television host whose most prominent work focuses on race and politics in America.


    827 Comments

    1. Very good collection of essays. Part memoir. Part riffs on Bell's interests. Part cultural criticism. The essays all have a meandering quality as if the writer is sitting next to you, telling you a good story. He is particularly good at showing his growth personally and professionally. Lots of warmth and heart and intelligence here.


    2. W. Kamau Bell has written his thoughts and ruminations for our examination. He describes being the only child of two awesome parents. Although his parents separated when he was two years old, both parents impacted his life in the best possible way. Kamau's mother conversed with him as an equal even from a young age. His father's mantra was that nobody can beat hard work.Kamau grew up loving superheroes, especially Spiderman and The Hulk. Wearing a Spiderman red and blue mask or the "greenness" o [...]


    3. Think it's probably best I don't rate this because it didn't work for me at all. I'd never heard of Bell before, and I couldn't figure out why I was spending time listening to him. He taught me something: I'd never heard of Cisgender before, though his explanation flew by before I caught it. It means "denoting or relating to a person whose sense of personal identity and gender corresponds with their birth sex." Seems like we're doing an awful lot of talk about one's personal sexual life these da [...]


    4. I hate to write this because I like Bell and how (sorry to use the overused) #woke and intersectional he is, but I was so unimpressed. There wasn't a single laugh-out-loud moment for me, not a single enraging moment (when he talked about prejudice), nothing really stood out for me. Which sucks because his book is about how he deals with coming up short in his comedy career. I wanted to like this book but it was middling.


    5. I am a fan of Bell's work and, as such, was really looking forward to reading this. BUT, I am totally going to be a asshole here and say that, even for an ARC, this book was riddled with too many errors. The essays are smart and thoughtful and funny, but the need for proofreading and copy editing really got distracting and took away from my appreciation of Bell's message.


    6. I had never heard of W. Kamau Bell (insert living under a rock joke here), but a friend suggested this. I will be honest, I didn't really care too much for the early parts of the book (him finding himself), but the later chapters really impressed me. I like his line of thinking. I'll be checking him out in the near future.


    7. I stumbled over United Shades of America on tv and found it interesting then saw this book in my local library on the new shelves.The book reads like Bell speaks and that was good, I didn't find it hard to read and the familiarity was reassuring. He came across on paper as he does in USoA likeable, laid-back, smart. His book was very thought provoking and it left me at times amused, confused, frustrated. His book made me want to talk to him, or someone, regarding the racism he deals with and his [...]


    8. There were a few gems dropped in this book, like this one: "Being able to say no is the most power you can ever have. It is either a luxury when you can afford to leave, or it is necessary for survival when the cost to stay is waaaaay too high." Parts of this book were entertaining, clever, and insightful which piqued my interest enough to make me want to check out his tv show.


    9. I love rambly memoir-style books written by comedians, and W. Kamau Bell’s riff on the genre does not disappoint. Bell covers everything from being raised by an activist mom who spoke to him like an equal, to his long, slow journey to becoming a successful comedian doing shows that are true to himself and his values, to his marriage to a white woman and parenting his biracial daughters. In performing the audio version, Bell comes across as affable and genuine, and he is willing to own his mist [...]


    10. I have never before heard about W. Kamau Bell, but now I am a huge fan! This guy is not only funny, he is outstanding. He touched racism, sexism, self confidence and so many other topics. There were few moments that I wasn't laughing or nodding my head in enthusiastic agreement. He is huge, and for now, the best book that I read in 2018. Kamau grew up with a great strong mother. And of course he grew up black, both things make him a great supporter of equal rights for everyone. I wish that I cou [...]


    11. I saw this book at the library, I'd seen commercials for his show on CNN, but never watched, but the book looked interesting so I checked it out. It didn't take long until I knew I needed to buy this for myself and as an audiobook so I could hear these stories in his own voice. Excellent all the way through, from his growing up stories, to his career stories, but especially all those little moments throughout that speak to sexism, racism, genderism, and so much more that make this crazy complex [...]


    12. Definitely a fun book by one of my favorite sociopolitical comedians. I saw him perform in Denver and have been a fan of his TV shows and podcasts. The memoir fills in a lot of details behind this interesting black man.


    13. В 2007 году я оказался без работы и в абсолютном творчеством тупике. Тексты не заказывали. Выступать со стендапами не приглашали. Я был в трансе. Я чувствовал, что потратил годы, чтобы добиться сокрушительного поражения. Я делил съемную двухкомнатную квартиру с двумя другим [...]


    14. I didn't enjoy this book as much as I appreciated it. I wanted to hear more Black points of view, and I read it for that - trying to understand, trying to put myself in shoes I can never fill (and not just because Bell is 6'4") and imagine what on earth it must be like to be a Black man in America. Of course I failed - I can't even put myself in the place of a Black woman. But understand or not, it's important that I try, if for no other reason than to try to minimize my damage.This is not a fun [...]


    15. Thanks, Dutton, for sending me an ARC!While I initially wanted to read this because I wanted to learn more about Kamau, I quickly realized that this was way more than just another comedian's memoir. Race, racism, and politics are heavily threaded throughout and I'm on board. He's also candid about his experiences in stand-up and in the entertainment industry, which really opened my eyes to not just how completely screwed up the showrunning/writing relationship can be, but also how representation [...]


    16. Had some interest in reading about Bell after having seen an episode of his CNN show. I think he gives readers i good idea about who he is and how he arrived to his present situation. He is not your "typical" Black comedian but still appears to understand, thanks to his parents a debt and commitment to the Black community. He writes with a big dose of humor and shared some moments that readers will find loud laugh funny. He also has thoughts on race and challenges to white Americans to do more a [...]


    17. I had heard of W. Kamau Bell, but didn't know much about him until he spoke at the American Library Association conference this past weekend. He was side-splittingly funny on a day when most of the crowd was in mourning - and he thankfully capitalized on that by showing our new president no mercy. I was glad I grabbed a copy of his book, which expanded on themes he talked about in his speech - politics, being black in America, and parenting mixed-race children. It's a book every white person sho [...]


    18. This book gave me so much life that I think I want to buy the print version even though I just listened to it--just so I can annotate with lots of hearts and exclamation points all the places where I just died with how much I agreed with him. He says amazing things about media representation, tells funny stories about his life, and says real shit about insidious racism of nice white people. An amazing book.


    19. I picked up this book because a friend had recommended I watch an episode of United Shades of America on Chinese-Americans, and it piqued my interest enough to make me want to find out more about the host. So far I've only seen that one episode, but I'd like to go back and watch others. This book is part memoir, part comedic social and political commentary. We follow the author from his childhood in different cities, through his time as a struggling stand-up comic, and into his current gig as ho [...]


    20. Subtitle: "tales of a 6' 4", African American, heterosexual, cisgender, left-leaning, asthmatic, Black and proud blerd, mama's boy, dad, and stand-up comedian". Yes, blerd: “A nerd who is of African American descent” (thank you, urbandictionary). I listened to the audio version, narrated by Bell himself, which was very enjoyable. Bell can be seen on CNN, hosting “The United Shades of America”, and he’s known for his political comedy. You’ll definitely get a sense of that here, along [...]


    21. I loved W. Kamau Bell's show on CNN, and when I learned he had written a book I had to read it. Kamau talks about his childhood, his early standup career, and his family life. In between each chapter, he gives his opinion on such things as superheroes, sports, Denzel Washington, Creed the movie, the election, etc. He talks about some serious issues in a comedic way that I personally enjoy. If you like him or his show, I suggest you read this book. ~April


    22. I was not aware of W. Kamau Bell before reading this book, but I am glad to be enlightened. He uses humor to shed light on some tough issues. I appreciated how much he shared about his journey in life. After finishing the book I immediately went to youtube to look for interviews and clips from his television shows. I am now subscribed to his CNN show "United Shades of America." Definitely a recommended book!


    23. I ended up really enjoying this book, though I think I would have preferred to read it, rather than listen. Some authors really bring their stories to life in audiobooks, but I felt like Bell was reading me his story instead of telling me his story (for amazing author narrations of memoirs, see: Trevor Noah, Lindy West, Shonda Rimes, Tina Fey, and Rachel Dratch - to name a few). But I loved how willing he was to admit that he's still learning about so many things (sexism, homophobia, transphobia [...]


    24. I first discovered W Kamau Bell when he had his Totally Biased show on FX, later FXX. This week, his United Shades of America was nominated for an Emmy. His "comedy" makes us take a hard look at what's happening in the world and charges us with making a change. My latest issue of EW arrived today, and Black Panther is on the cover. Prior to his book, I probably would have thought, "What an amazing cast." Now, I thought, "What an amazing cast. Kamau is right, though. Why can't the superhero just [...]


    25. Really good on several levels.I listen to a lot of celeb memoirs. I like hearing their backgrounds, their coming-up stories, and how they got their big break. (Answer: by working really, really hard and not being a dick. Usually.) When they devolve into grudge-settling, it is usually a turn off. I worried when he talked about his experience in television that it was veering in that direction. However, what I ended up seeing were richly illustrated examples of how microaggression & entitlemen [...]


    26. Really well-done memoir about not just Bell's life and career, but about his experiences with racism, sexism, and social justice in general. Probably my favorite thing about this book was Bell's approach to everything - there was not one thing that happened to him that he didn't claim at least some responsibility for, and his attitude of learning was so refreshing in our current day in the U.S. I wish everyone could approach their life and work with his same attitude of wanting to know more, wan [...]


    27. This was fine, but could have really used a stronger editor. It was way too long and repeated itself a lot. There were some places where things were listed endlessly, or sidebars went on so far that I lost track of where we were getting back to. It probably also got shorted unfairly because I listened to it just after Invisible Man, Got the Whole World Watching: A Young Black Man's Education which dealt with some of the same themes, but in a much stronger way.


    28. A very amusing and smart collection of essays. I feel like I might have liked this book a liiiittle more if I listened to the audiobook. Maybe because his work is usually more aural than prose it feels like Kamau is talking to you -the audience - and that seems to make for better listening than reading imo.


    29. I can't give you the right words to tell you why you should read this book. (FWIW, I listened to the audio, read by Bell, and it is SO GREAT hearing it in his voice!) I want to scour every corner of YouTube for all things Kamau. This book is funny, entertaining, smart, thoughtful, reflective, will challenge you and make you think Read it. Go.


    30. The title really says it all the galley was a jumble of random, awkward thoughts. I assume the physical copies will go through a bit more editing as the digital copy was a mess. As always, I had some difficulty with all of the pop culture references (I don't know! We didn't watch much TV growing up), but otherwise a quick read.


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