A Woman Like That: Lesbian And Bisexual Writers Tell Their Coming Out Stories

A Woman Like That: Lesbian And Bisexual Writers Tell Their Coming Out Stories

Joan Larkin / Aug 19, 2019

A Woman Like That Lesbian And Bisexual Writers Tell Their Coming Out Stories The act of coming out has the power to transform every aspect of a woman s life family friendships career sexuality spirituality An essential element of self realization it is the unabashed accep

  • Title: A Woman Like That: Lesbian And Bisexual Writers Tell Their Coming Out Stories
  • Author: Joan Larkin
  • ISBN: 9780380802470
  • Page: 249
  • Format: Paperback
  • The act of coming out has the power to transform every aspect of a woman s life family, friendships, career, sexuality, spirituality An essential element of self realization, it is the unabashed acceptance of one s outlaw standing in a predominantly heterosexual world.These accounts sometimes heart wrenching, often exhilarating encompass a wide breadth of backgThe act of coming out has the power to transform every aspect of a woman s life family, friendships, career, sexuality, spirituality An essential element of self realization, it is the unabashed acceptance of one s outlaw standing in a predominantly heterosexual world.These accounts sometimes heart wrenching, often exhilarating encompass a wide breadth of backgrounds and experiences From a teenager institutionalized for her passion for women to the mother who must come out to her young sons at the risk of losing them from the cautious academic to the raucous liberated femme each woman represented here tells of forging a unique path toward the difficult but emancipating recognition of herself Extending from the 1940s to the present day, these intensely personal stories in turn reflect a unique history of the changing social s that affected each woman s ability to determine the shape of her own life Together they form an ornate tapestry of lesbian and bisexual experience in the United States over the past half century This song is dedicated to the one I love Bertha Harris Widows Judy Grahn Mad for her Jill Johnston First love Karla Jay Novelties Joan Nestle The secret agent Jane DeLynn My debut Blanche McCrary Boyd Red light, green light Beatrix Gates A vision Rebecca Brown Richard Nixon and me Heather Lewis Cherry picker Chrystos Born queer Judith Katz What comes first Holly Hughes House of corals Cheryl Boyce Taylor Bride of Christ Mary Beth Caschetta The coming out of a gay pride child Elizabeth Lorde Rollins Easter Weekend Minnie Bruce Pratt Pot luck Cynthia Bond A letter to some lesbians who ve been out for a long time Mariana Romo Carmona Waking up Jacquie Bishop Banditos Eileen Myles Coming out or going deeply in Margaret Randall Sequins in the mud a cover girl comes out Karin Cook Mind and body Wendy W Fairey Always coming Letta Neely This girl is different Tristam Taormino Picture this Cecilia Tan Layers of the onion, spokes of the wheel Pat Calafia Freedom rings Kanani Kauka Together alone Eva Kollisch Diary of a mad lesbian Lesle a Newman.

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      Published :2019-05-15T22:24:50+00:00

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      • Joan Larkin

        Joan Larkin Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the A Woman Like That: Lesbian And Bisexual Writers Tell Their Coming Out Stories book, this is one of the most wanted Joan Larkin author readers around the world.


    643 Comments

    1. A Woman Like That is quite depressing. There are, admittedly, a few gems scattered throughout — stories that pierce the heart with a sense of recognition and a feeling of community with the writer, and exhilaration or empathy (sometimes both) for her trials — but too often there is a dull, relentless pain that permeates the tales of this anthology. Maybe this is the editor’s intention. Maybe, in efforts to exhibit the “full scope” of lesbian experiences, that continuous pain is welcome [...]


    2. It took me a very long time to read this book. While it was beautiful and full of so many amazing writers, I just couldn't stand slogging through so many horrible and heart-wrenching stories and having to think about what that means in a book about coming out. I know that that's the reality, and it helped me recognize my privilege in being a part of this generation and feeling so comfortable in my identities, but man was it hard to read. I finally finished the last few stories in one big gulp, a [...]


    3. Disappointing. That is the best adjective I can find to describe this book. I felt like I was reading a textbook, expected to highlight and take notes but didn't know what the test would be about. The first half of the book lacked personality. All the stories read the same. No passion for life; just dull. I don't know if the editor over edited, or if these women knew each other and had no defining style, but it was BORING!The second half of the book seemed to lack that same editing flair. In fac [...]


    4. This book is hard to review, the stories are personal revelations by the authors, however they weren't particularly interesting. While I sympathize with the difficulty many of the writers had with coming-out, I can't put myself into their place so I think that is where the disconnect lies. I imagine this is probably on my bookshelf because of the story by Elizabeth Lorde-Rollins. I went to high school with her brother and remember him as one of the first boys I ever kissed.


    5. Read this book years ago. I absolutely agree that some of the stories were difficult to follow and hard to finish, however, there were a few gems that made it worth it. Pat Califia has such a way with words "coming out begins when we recognize, in a stigmatized Other, something of ourselves" *swoon*


    6. Although these stories were incredibly personal, I found myself unable to relate to several of them and even lost interest in a few as I wondered where the author was going with their story. However, it was an overall good read. The proof, I suppose, is evident from my markings throughout the book and my interest in the authors works beyond their contribution to this literary work.


    7. Always reading to find myself. Maybe to figure out who I am. Each story was inspiring in its own way. I enjoyed getting a glimpse into queer life of earlier years.






    8. As a newly out lesbian in the mid '90s, I loved this anthology of personal stories. It helped me understand myself and understand what that would mean in my life.



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