In the Wake of the Butcher: Cleveland's Torso Murders

In the Wake of the Butcher: Cleveland's Torso Murders

James Jessen Badal / Dec 06, 2019

In the Wake of the Butcher Cleveland s Torso Murders On September while walking along Lake Erie beach near his Cleveland home Frank LaGassie made a gruesome discovery Partially buried was the lower half of a woman s torso legs amputated at th

  • Title: In the Wake of the Butcher: Cleveland's Torso Murders
  • Author: James Jessen Badal
  • ISBN: 9780873386890
  • Page: 237
  • Format: Paperback
  • On September 5, 1934, while walking along Lake Erie beach near his Cleveland home, Frank LaGassie made a gruesome discovery Partially buried was the lower half of a woman s torso, legs amputated at the knees This Lady of the Lake, as she was dubbed by the police and the press, was the first in a terrifying series of decapitation murders that haunted Cleveland for the nexOn September 5, 1934, while walking along Lake Erie beach near his Cleveland home, Frank LaGassie made a gruesome discovery Partially buried was the lower half of a woman s torso, legs amputated at the knees This Lady of the Lake, as she was dubbed by the police and the press, was the first in a terrifying series of decapitation murders that haunted Cleveland for the next few years From 1934 to 1938, the Torso Killer left the corpses of at least twelve victims in and around the Kingshury Run area of Cleveland A frightened city turned to its safety director, the legendary Eliot Ness, who focused energy and manpower on this investigation than any previous police action in Cleveland But the killer was never arrested, or even officially identified In the Wake of the Butcher Cleveland s Torso Murders is the first detailed, book length examination of these horrific crimes Where previous examinations of the Kingsbury Run murders have relied almost exclusively on contemporary newspaper coverage, this compelling account is based on police reports, autopsy protocols, personal interviews with the descendants of victims and investigators, and unpublished manuscripts Illustrat

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      Published :2019-09-15T18:00:41+00:00

    About "James Jessen Badal"

      • James Jessen Badal

        James Jessen Badal Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the In the Wake of the Butcher: Cleveland's Torso Murders book, this is one of the most wanted James Jessen Badal author readers around the world.


    243 Comments

    1. If you like true crime, this is an unsolved case you must read about! This account is not dramatized, so it did take me a while to get through. It has reliable info, tons of great tidbits about the Torso Murders, and is also an interesting read regarding Cleveland's history. Would have liked if the maps were nearer to the beginning or interspersed with the corresponding victim numbers.


    2. [There is apparently a revised and updated edition of this book, which I will be keeping an eye out for.]This was a much better book than Torso: The Story of Eliot Ness and the Search for a Psychopathic Killer. Badal is a good writer, he's done extensive primary research, and he's not trying to argue an indefensible thesis. He lays the baffling story of the Cleveland Torso Murders (as baffling in their way as The Thames Torso Murders) out clearly and with careful attention both to maintaining na [...]


    3. The best book around about this infamous and unknown killer that struck and murdered right under Cleveland's Safety Director Eliot Ness' department during the early and late 1930s. The gruesomeness of the killings, the cunningness and the complete lack of motive from the killer(s) still completely baffle any detective and true crime reader. Astounding book which, besides reporting on the murders, will paint a grim picture of the poorer districts of Cleveland in that decade. Remarkable book.


    4. Pretty gnarly book. Great pictures of what was left of the victims. Depending on what your idea of great is. This is definitely not a book for the squeamish. And if you get freaked out easily, this book might make you add a half dozen bolt locks on all your doors, even though this particular killer didn't break into houses. Or did he? Nobody knows. A very well written and to the point book about a truly terrifying killer that never got close to being caught. 4.5 stars.


    5. Between 1934 and 1938, Cleveland, Ohio was gripped by a series of gruesome discoveries. Body parts, often headless torsos, started to appear with alarming regularity, with little or no indication of who they were, how they had been killed, and most importantly, who killed them. Even the hiring of famous G-man Eliot Ness, the 'man who nabbed Capone,' failed to stem the tide of brutal slayings. Then suddenly, the killings stopped, and what few leads police had dissipated into the ether.James Badal [...]


    6. How many people outside of NE Ohio are aware that a wave of horrific unsolved crimes, rivaling -- if not exceeding -- the wave of terror committed by Jack The Ripper in Victorian London plagued Cleveland in the 1930s? The Torso Murders are up there in "unsolved crimes of the century" standing and are unresolved to this day.An unknown killer, given the sobriquet "Butcher of Kingsbury Run" ran amok in a frenzy of violence between 1935 and 1938, when the killings stopped abruptly. The Butcher's wor [...]


    7. The fact that the murders went unsolved almost guarantees that this account isn't going to go anywhere (giving us innumerable descriptions of citizens stumbling across body parts, police moving in to search for additional clues, ultimately reaching another dead end, etc.). The lack of evidence in the case isn't the fault of the author of course, but compelling accounts can and have been written about unsolved crimes. What really grates is the author's condescending tone. He bemoans the inadequac [...]


    8. This book takes in-depth look into one of America's first serial killers (before the term even existed) and explores who the killer might have been. In the Wake of the Butcher is a little frustrating; it should have been better. It is odd that this story isn't up there with other killers like the Zodiac or Son of Sam because it is just as distrubing and far, far more violent (Jack the Ripper's actions seem to be on par). The inclusion of pictures is important in most of these style of true-crime [...]


    9. For such a heavy topic for a college professor to tackle, Badal shows there is no way to track down a killer unless we pick things up from the start, and to do so he prepares us with clarity and a matter-of-factness I was grateful to have with me upon the final page. This book urged me to read Badal's other works, and it's not so much the topic as it is his way of crafting this series of events into an all-out page turner. A big diamond in the rough.


    10. Being a Cleveland native, I found this story so fascinating. Elliot Ness being involved was an added bonus to this whodunit. I used to take the train right through the area where many of these murders occurred and I used to envision being back in the thirties allot while riding through. A really good read, if you love true crime.


    11. Without question, the most disturbing book I have ever read. I was incredulous when I found out about this unsolved case, I thought I knew every unsolved serial killer case in history. James Badal's painstaking research pays off, as he provides chilling details about the murders, along with disturbing police photographs that are not for the squeamish. True crime fans, this is a must read.


    12. I had to read this book for my Ohio History class. It is very interesting and I had previously been unaware of this part of Cleveland's history. The pictures, however, are NOT for the faint of heart. Actual pics from the crime scenes and morgue. For those that are interested in real-life crime reads, this is likely a good pick for you.


    13. Pretty interesting book, but not the best written. Definitely worth a read if only to learn a little bit of history close to home.


    14. Occasionally awkward sentence construction, but a masterful overview of the Torso Murders. Does not brush aside problems that plague scholarship, such as missing documents.



    15. Very informative on such a dramatic part of Cleveland's history. Brings up interesting points that aren't usually discussed and that many people do not know about.


    16. Factual, detailed account of one of the 20th century's most gruesome series of murders, told through eyewitness statements and interviews with descendants of those closely involved in the case.


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