The Complete Peanuts, 1963-1966

The Complete Peanuts, 1963-1966

Charles M. Schulz / Sep 17, 2019

The Complete Peanuts As they have the previous three holiday seasons Fantagraphics are offering a boxed set collecting the current and previous volumes in a new slipcase designed by the award winning gra

  • Title: The Complete Peanuts, 1963-1966
  • Author: Charles M. Schulz
  • ISBN: 9781560978688
  • Page: 444
  • Format: Hardcover
  • As they have the previous three holiday seasons, Fantagraphics are offering a boxed set collecting the current 1965 66 and previous 1963 64 volumes, in a new slipcase designed by the award winning graphic novelist, Seth It s the perfect gift book item of the season In The Complete Peanuts 1963 64 this volume is particularly rich in never before reprinted strips OverAs they have the previous three holiday seasons, Fantagraphics are offering a boxed set collecting the current 1965 66 and previous 1963 64 volumes, in a new slipcase designed by the award winning graphic novelist, Seth It s the perfect gift book item of the season In The Complete Peanuts 1963 64 this volume is particularly rich in never before reprinted strips Over 150 than one fifth of the book have never seen the light of day since their original appearance over 40 years ago, so this will be a trove of undiscovered treasures even for avid Peanuts collectors These lost strips include Linus making a near successful run for class president that is ultimately derailed by his religious beliefs two words great and pumpkin , and Snoopy getting involved with a group of politically fanatical birds One wonders Was it the political edge in these stories that got them consigned to oblivion for so long Also worthy of note is an extended, never reprinted sequence in which Snoopy gets ill and heads to the veterinarian hospitalAlso in this volume Lucy s attempts at improving her friends branches out from her increasingly well visited nickel psychiatry booth to an educational slideshow of Charlie Brown s faults it s so long there s an intermission Also, Snoopy s doghouse begins its conceptual expansion, as Schulz reveals that the dog owns a Van Gogh, and that the ceiling is so huge that Linus can paint a vast and as it turns out unappreciated history of civilization mural on it And baseball continues to be a mainstay Charlie Brown suffers from pitcher s elbow and is replaced by Linus, who turns out to be a vast improvement he also blows several crucial matches through various screw ups one with the little red haired girl in attendance and adding insult to injury, his favorite baseball player is demoted to the minor league The Complete Peanuts 1963 64 features a new introduction by animator Bill Melendez, producer of over 75 Peanuts animated specials and movies, including the classic A Charlie Brown Christmas.In The Complete Peanuts 1965 66 We are now in the mid 1960s, one of Schulz s peak periods of creativity and one third of the way through the strip s life Snoopy has become the strip s dominant personality, and this volume marks two milestones for the character the first of many dogfights with the nefarious Red Baron, and the launch of his writing career It was a dark and stormy night Two new characters the first two from outside the strip s regular little neighborhood make their bows Roy who befriends Charlie Brown and then Linus at summer camp won t have a lasting impact, but upon his return from camp he regales a friend of his with tales of the strange kids he met, and she has to go check them out for herself Her name Peppermint Patty The Complete Peanuts 1965 66 features a new introduction by Hal Hartley, writer director of acclaimed independent films Trust, Henry Fool, Kimono, Simple Men, The Unbelievable Truth, and Fay Grim.

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      444 Charles M. Schulz
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      Posted by:Charles M. Schulz
      Published :2019-06-05T14:41:20+00:00

    About "Charles M. Schulz"

      • Charles M. Schulz

        Charles Monroe Schulz was an American cartoonist, whose comic strip Peanuts proved one of the most popular and influential in the history of the medium, and is still widely reprinted on a daily basis.Schulz s first regular cartoons, Li l Folks, were published from 1947 to 1950 by the St Paul Pioneer Press he first used the name Charlie Brown for a character there, although he applied the name in four gags to three different boys and one buried in sand The series also had a dog that looked much like Snoopy In 1948, Schulz sold a cartoon to The Saturday Evening Post the first of 17 single panel cartoons by Schulz that would be published there In 1948, Schulz tried to have Li l Folks syndicated through the Newspaper Enterprise Association Schulz would have been an independent contractor for the syndicate, unheard of in the 1940s, but the deal fell through Li l Folks was dropped from the Pioneer Press in January, 1950.Later that year, Schulz approached the United Feature Syndicate with his best strips from Li l Folks, and Peanuts made its first appearance on October 2, 1950 The strip became one of the most popular comic strips of all time He also had a short lived sports oriented comic strip called It s Only a Game 1957 1959 , but he abandoned it due to the demands of the successful Peanuts From 1956 to 1965 he contributed a single panel strip Young Pillars featuring teenagers to Youth, a publication associated with the Church of God.Peanuts ran for nearly 50 years, almost without interruption during the life of the strip, Schulz took only one vacation, a five week break in late 1997 At its peak, Peanuts appeared in than 2,600 newspapers in 75 countries Schulz stated that his routine every morning consisted of eating a jelly donut and sitting down to write the day s strip After coming up with an idea which he said could take anywhere from a few minutes to a few hours , he began drawing it, which took about an hour for dailies and three hours for Sunday strips He stubbornly refused to hire an inker or letterer, saying that it would be equivalent to a golfer hiring a man to make his putts for him In November 1999 Schulz suffered a stroke, and later it was discovered that he had colon cancer that had metastasized Because of the chemotherapy and the fact he could not read or see clearly, he announced his retirement on December 14, 1999 Schulz often touched on religious themes in his work, including the classic television cartoon, A Charlie Brown Christmas 1965 , which features the character Linus van Pelt quoting the King James Version of the Bible Luke 2 8 14 to explain what Christmas is all about In personal interviews Schulz mentioned that Linus represented his spiritual side Schulz, reared in the Lutheran faith, had been active in the Church of God as a young adult and then later taught Sunday school at a United Methodist Church In the 1960s, Robert L Short interpreted certain themes and conversations in Peanuts as being consistent with parts of Christian theology, and used them as illustrations during his lectures about the gospel, as he explained in his bestselling paperback book, The Gospel According to Peanuts, the first of several books he wrote on religion and Peanuts, and other popular culture items.From the late 1980s, however, Schulz described himself in interviews as a secular humanist I do not go to church any I guess you might say I ve come around to secular humanism, an obligation I believe all humans have to others and the world we live in.


    697 Comments

    1. Peanuts is really hitting its stride during this period.Schulz was such a genius. The "psychiatric help" stand replacing the lemonade stand is one of the most brilliant images ever to summarize mid-20th-century culture. And then there's Schroeder at his little piano, Linus and the Great Pumpkin, and of course my profile-photo surrogate.Imagine making great art that actually reaches so many people. Imagine making art that makes people genuinely happy.


    2. 1963-1966 is when the Peanuts cartoons really got good. I remember reading many of these strips as a child, but I had forgotten how Peppermint Patty was introduced. It's such a treat to read these again as an adult.




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