In the Beginning, Woman Was the Sun: The Autobiography of a Japanese Feminist

In the Beginning, Woman Was the Sun: The Autobiography of a Japanese Feminist

Raicho Hiratsuka Teruko Craig / Jul 24, 2019

In the Beginning Woman Was the Sun The Autobiography of a Japanese Feminist In the beginning woman was truly the sun An authentic person Now she is the moon a wan and sickly moon dependent on another reflecting another s brilliance Hiratsuku RaichoRaicho Hiratsuka

  • Title: In the Beginning, Woman Was the Sun: The Autobiography of a Japanese Feminist
  • Author: Raicho Hiratsuka Teruko Craig
  • ISBN: 9780231138130
  • Page: 497
  • Format: Paperback
  • In the beginning, woman was truly the sun An authentic person Now she is the moon, a wan and sickly moon, dependent on another, reflecting another s brilliance Hiratsuku RaichoRaicho Hiratsuka 1886 1971 was the most influential figure in the early women s movement in Japan In 1911, she founded Bluestocking Seito , Japan s first literary journal run by women In 19 In the beginning, woman was truly the sun An authentic person Now she is the moon, a wan and sickly moon, dependent on another, reflecting another s brilliance Hiratsuku RaichoRaicho Hiratsuka 1886 1971 was the most influential figure in the early women s movement in Japan In 1911, she founded Bluestocking Seito , Japan s first literary journal run by women In 1920, she founded the New Women s Association, Japan s first nationwide women s organization to campaign for female suffrage, and soon after World War II, the Japan Federation of Women s Organizations.Available for the first time in English, In the Beginning, Woman Was the Sun is Raicho Hiratsuka s autobiography of her childhood, early youth, and subsequent rebellion against the strict social codes of the time Hiratsuka came from an upper middle class Tokyo family, and her restless quest for truth led her to read widely in philosophy and undertake Zen training at Japan Woman s College After graduation, she gained brief notoriety for her affair with a married writer, but quickly established herself as a brilliant and articulate leader of feminist causes with the launch of the journal Seito Her richly detailed account presents a woman who was at once idealistic and elitist, fearless and vain, and a perceptive observer of society.Teruko Craig s translation captures Hiratsuka s strong personality and distinct voice At a time when interest in Japanese feminism is growing in the West, there is no finer introduction to Japanese women s history than this intimate, candid, and compelling memoir.

    • Best Download [Raicho Hiratsuka Teruko Craig] ↠ In the Beginning, Woman Was the Sun: The Autobiography of a Japanese Feminist || [Cookbooks Book] PDF ½
      497 Raicho Hiratsuka Teruko Craig
    • thumbnail Title: Best Download [Raicho Hiratsuka Teruko Craig] ↠ In the Beginning, Woman Was the Sun: The Autobiography of a Japanese Feminist || [Cookbooks Book] PDF ½
      Posted by:Raicho Hiratsuka Teruko Craig
      Published :2019-04-02T02:12:30+00:00

    About "Raicho Hiratsuka Teruko Craig"

      • Raicho Hiratsuka Teruko Craig

        Raich Hiratsuka Hiratsuka Raich , February 10, 1886 May 24, 1971 was a writer, journalist, political activist, anarchist and pioneering Japanese feminist.Born Haru Hiratsuka Hiratsuka Haru in Tokyo in 1886, the second daughter of a high ranking civil servant, and educated at Japan Women s University in 1903, Hiratsuka came to be influenced by contemporary currents of European philosophy, as well as Zen Buddhism, of which she would become a devoted practitioner Of particular influence to her was turn of the century Swedish feminist writer Ellen Key, some of whose works she translated into Japanese, and the individualistic heroine of Henrik Ibsen s A Doll s House 1879.Upon graduation from university, Hiratsuka entered the Narumi Women s English School where, in 1911, she founded Japan s first all women literary magazine, Seit , lit Bluestocking She began the first issue with the words, In the beginning, woman was the sun a reference to the Shinto goddess Amaterasu, and to the spiritual independence which women had lost Adopting the pen name Raich Thunderbird , she began to call for a women s spiritual revolution, and within its first few years the journal s focus shifted from literature to women s issues, including candid discussion of female sexuality, chastity and abortion Contributors included renowned poet and women s rights proponent Yosano Akiko, among others.Exaggerated stories of their love affairs and nonconformism, spread by Japan s mainstream press, turned public opinion against the magazine and prompted Raicho to publish several fierce defenses of her ideals Her April 1913 essay To the Women of the World rejected the conventional role of women as ry sai kenbo , Good wife and wise mother I wonder how many women have, for the sake of financial security in their lives, entered into loveless marriages to become one man s lifelong servant and prostitute This nonconformism pitted Seit not only against the society but the state, contributing to the censorship of women s magazines that disturbed public order or introduced Western ideas about women incompatible with Japan.The journal folded in 1915, but not before establishing its founder as a leading light in Japan s women s movement Meanwhile, in 1914, Hiratsuka began living openly with her younger lover, artist Okumura Hiroshi, with whom she had two children out of wedlock and eventually married in 1941.In 1920, following an investigation into female workers conditions in textile factories in Nagoya which further galvanized her political resolve, Hiratsuka founded the New Women s Association together with fellow women s rights activist Ichikawa Fusae It was largely through this group s efforts that the Article 5 of the Police Security Regulations which, enacted in 1900, had barred women from joining political organizations and holding or attending political meetings was overturned in 1922 Women s suffrage, however, remained elusive in Japan A further and controversial campaign attempted to ban men with venereal disease from marrying This unsuccessful campaign remains a point of controversy surrounding Hiratsuka s career in that it saw her aligned herself with the eugenics movement, asserting that the spread of V.D was having a detrimental effect on the Japanese race The next couple of decades saw Hiratsuka withdraw somewhat from the public eye, saddled with debts and her lover beset with health problems, although she would continue to write and lecture In the postwar years, however, she emerged again as a public figure through the peace movement In 1950, the day after the outbreak of the Korean War, she traveled to the United States together with writer and activist Nogami Yaeko and three other members of the Japan Women s Movement in order to present US Secretary of State Dean Acheson with a request that a system


    573 Comments

    1. My review, originally published in Monumenta Nipponica 62.3 (2007): 369-371, is available here: jstor/stable/25066524.


    2. Really interesting book about one of the creators of Japan's first feminist magazine. Narrative ends in 1917. Interesting tho how you find the evil jealous gay trope everywhere though (this narrative actually has two minor evil jealous gays - one female and one male).


    Leave a Reply