The Outward Room

The Outward Room

Millen Brand Peter Cameron / Mar 29, 2020

The Outward Room The Outward Room is a book about a young woman s journey from madness to self discovery It created a sensation when it was first published in and has lost none of its immediacy or its power to m

  • Title: The Outward Room
  • Author: Millen Brand Peter Cameron
  • ISBN: 9781590173596
  • Page: 375
  • Format: Paperback
  • The Outward Room is a book about a young woman s journey from madness to self discovery It created a sensation when it was first published in 1937, and has lost none of its immediacy or its power to move the reader Having suffered a nervous breakdown after her brother s death in a car accident, Harriet Demuth is committed to a mental hospital, but her doctor s FreudianThe Outward Room is a book about a young woman s journey from madness to self discovery It created a sensation when it was first published in 1937, and has lost none of its immediacy or its power to move the reader Having suffered a nervous breakdown after her brother s death in a car accident, Harriet Demuth is committed to a mental hospital, but her doctor s Freudian nostrums do little to make her well Convinced that she and she alone can refashion her life, Harriet makes a daring escape from the hospital hopping a train by night and riding the rails into the vastness of New York City in the light of the rising sun It is the middle of the Great Depression, and at first Harriet is lost among the city s anonymous multitudes She pawns her jewelry and lives an increasingly hand to mouth existence until she meets John, a machine shop worker Slowly Harriet begins to recover her sense of self slowly she and John begin to fall in love The story of that emerging love, told with the lyricism of Virginia Woolf and the realism of Theodore Dreiser, is the heart of Millen Brand s remarkable book.

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      Published :2019-09-10T12:02:14+00:00

    About "Millen Brand Peter Cameron"

      • Millen Brand Peter Cameron

        Millen Brand was an writer and poet His novels Savage Sleep and The Outward Room, which addressed mental health institutions, were bestsellers in the 1960s and 1930s, respectively.


    320 Comments

    1. I have often, in reviews, dismissed a novel as being cinematic. But there is bad cinematic and there is good cinematic. In bad cinematic, the protagonist's friend (or uncle/girlfriend/karate instructor) knows people in organized crime, what they call it, who come as a deus ex machina to the protagonist's rescue. Or, right before the protagonist dies he manages to have sex for the first and only time and thus has an heir to tie a nice bow on the story in an epilogue.The Outward Room is great cine [...]


    2. Another thought provoking read from the New York Review Books Classic list. This a beautifully delivered, simple and yet poignant story set against the backdrop of the Depression in New York.The story of Harriet her battle with Mental Illness and the relationship she finds with John, a factory worker who takes her in. This gentle story is about the highs and lows of everyday life and finding joy and healing in simple pleasures. It's also a tale of self discovery and healing for Harriet, who is s [...]


    3. The four page description of spending a night homeless on the New York subway c.1935 is worth the price of admission alone. It dramatically changed my perception and appreciation of the novel and fills all that comes afterwards with so much more weight.


    4. When I first heard about this book, I was excited to read it: who can deny the allure of the triumphant tale of a patient who escapes from an oppressive and ineffectual hospital, taking her destiny into her own hands? Initially I had doubts, though, that a sane man could write a truly convincing book from the perspective of a female psychiatric patient. Or rather, in light of the fact that mentally ill women are so frequently disenfranchised and stripped of their voices, I had qualms about the f [...]


    5. Shit, it's only March, but it's going to be tough to top this one as the best novel I'll read all year.I don't know I'd go so far to recommend it to most since it's so counter-intuitively simple and deceptively quiet and lovely that most, weaned on a steady diet of explosions, pop culture references, superpowers, and assertions of identity, might find it hard to get lost in this uncomplicated and great love story.That story is: a trouble young woman, institutionalized after the death of her brot [...]


    6. Madness. Wholeness. Healing through the tiny details of a life lived among others who care for us, and the terrible fragility we all navigate. This is a classic. So much larger than can be contained within its pages. THE OUTWARD ROOM is the best kind of philosophical book: one rooted in story, in character, and one in which the word 'philosophical' never appears, and yet it asks all the important questions, and does so brilliantly, in a mere 230 pages. Reward yourself. Read this book.


    7. That I was expecting something depressingly awful to happen at any moment just shows how sensationalistic and overly dramatic most fiction is and how well it has shaped our expectations--and how removed from the lived daily life most of us lead. This novel has a quiet, understated decency, depicting the lives of a couple--particularly the woman--eking out a living during the Depression. Think William Maxwell, and you're on the right track. (Maxwell was also a contemporary of Brand's, but unlike [...]


    8. I happened upon The Outward Room by chance recently and added it to my reading list, near the top.The story follows Harriet from her days at an institution where she was resigned in the aftermath of witnessing her older brother’s death. She escapes and, with almost no money, finds her way to New York, seeking normalcy for her life.With barely enough money to survive a week, she seeks a job and fails. Forced to sell her only possession—a ring given to her by her brother—she manages for a fe [...]


    9. "What should she do? “To talk” “to talk,” no, not to give him knowledge, not to see death again. His eyes. Better to go now. For could he help her? How could she expect him to help her? His note. What could she do if she left? Another night perhaps and what then— There was no way. “Want to talk” Her thoughts pried uselessly, caged, and she looked again at his note. His handwriting was strong; she grasped at any strength. Something would happen; even when there was no hope, somethin [...]


    10. I loved being in 1930s New York--the dark apartments with their soggy stairs; the courtyards filled with Italian children; the sweatshop the narrator briefly works in, cutting the threads off beautiful dresses. I enjoyed the realism of the story, and I found Harriet's child-like way with the world--after being in the hospital for so long--quite riveting, and surprising each time it came up.I didn't, however, like the more associative, stream of consciousness writing that was braided into the str [...]


    11. A sweet, odd novel originally published in 1937. Harriet is in a locked ward of an asylum since she had a nervous breakdown five years ago when her brother died in an accident. Her days are fenced in by the hospital routine, visits with her doctor, and interactions with other patients on the ward. Impulsively, she escapes and makes her way to New York.The novel is about her return to life and how her heart opens with her return to the world. I felt a little cynical about the incredible luck with [...]


    12. Think then, my soule, that death is but a Groome,Which brings a Taper to the outward roome,Whence thou spiest first a little glimmering light,And after brings it nearer to thy sight:For such approaches doth heaven make in death.----John DonneThis poignant novel is about death, life; darkness, light; madness, health; isolation, community.Millen Brand develops this counterpoint of ideas within the framework of a story about a young woman who escapes from a mental institution and hitchhikes her way [...]


    13. It is surprising that Millen Brand’s novel has fallen into relative obscurity. When I first came across this title and read the novel’s synopsis on the back cover, I was immediately reminded of a film starring Carroll Baker, Something Wild. When comparing the two stories, it’s easy to note the similarities between Brand’s 1937 novel and the 1961 film: a girl who experiences a shocking tragedy suffers from a nervous breakdown; she later runs away lost and alone, and in a moment of utter d [...]


    14. Somehow the idea of an asylum escapee trying to make it in The Big City is a lot more appealing than some rosy cheeked Career Girl trying to make a go of it. "The Outward Room" is all that and more, the literary equivalent to a sad Edward Hopper painting, i.e. "Automat" with the lonely girl in the cloche hat sitting all by herself in the diner, or his studies of the girl in night gown all by herself in her desolate afternoon tenement bedroom. Brand writes with a feminine touch, making the subjec [...]


    15. The NYRB continue to shock me and keep me in a constant state of awe. Millen Brand's outstanding The Outward Room asks of you nothing more than to reach inside your hearts and realize that no one is alone and each of us can find that something that excites us. Brand does an amazing job of putting us inside the mind of Harriet who is self proclaimed as insane. That and the incredibly vivid views of depression era New York City makes this one of the best that NYRB offers.


    16. I love when a book can be this plain and this quiet while still being highly emotionally evocative. It's masterful really. The book doesn't ride only off the emotional force tied to the underlying subject matter, though that is there. It doesn't pull cheap tricks either. The words are just set out there, plain. Somehow that all explodes inside the reader when the eyes run across those words. It might not be one of my most favorite books, but I was highly impressed.


    17. A beautiful, quiet, reflective novel that holds up moments in a chain, linking the heroine's incarceration in an institution to a path to life, and love, outside. This could have been even better were there not so many odd stream-of-consciousness diversions from the beautiful descriptions, but as it stands it's pretty damn good anyway.


    18. Beautiful love story! Refusing to let mental illness take over her life, I admired Harriet for this. 4 stars


    19. Thanks to Daniel@Boswell Books for the recommend. He recommends "Skippy Dies" in the same newsletter (and I so want to read that) that I know he has great taste!


    20. This book has been sitting on my shelf for far too long, and I'm glad I finally read it. I confess, I loved this book before the entrance of John. After that, I still enjoyed it, but not as much as I had been. I wanted to see Harriet continuing to make her way alone. But perhaps she was not capable of that. I've missed books like this. (I think what I mean by that is lyrical prose?) I need to find more


    21. This book was surprisingly good. It was mostly very well written and evocative of the time and places depicted. I couldn’t put it down because it was very engrossing, despite being a story about quiet daily life for the most part. This book also depicts PTSD flashbacks and sensory overwhelm in a highly convincing and sympathetic manner.


    22. this isn't a holiday read. I was glad to get to the end and start something which was more of a page turner. but it has stayed with me. Harriet is so innocent, like she has no skin, and so her experience of falling in love is very touching. it reminded me sometimes of Virginia Woolf, the streams of consciousness approach. recommended, but not for the beach.


    23. Reading this book was a little bit like dreaming. Not a nightmare, or an exciting adventure dream, but just an average, calm dream. There weren't a lot of ups and downs, and all of the edges were a bit rounded. Things didn't feel quite real most of the time, or at least felt like they were coming to me from a distance, or through a couple of layers of gauze. I don't say this as a criticism. I actually think it was a really great storytelling technique, and I bow to Brand's ability to keep that g [...]


    24. This is a beautifully told story that manages to wrap the reader up. The storyline is simple and sparing, as is the quality of the prose. Brand's style encouraged me to care deeply about the characters' plights - without barraging me with the thick descriptions that would make me feel it were all being shoved down my throat.In some respects, though, this novel is a real curate's egg. It operates using a stream of consciousness that feels clunky when set against the attempts of (later) writers. T [...]


    25. I picked this volume up on a lark, while browsing at one of my favorite bookstores. I always love the NYRB covers and after reading a bit of the back cover, I decided to buy it.I think it hung out in my bookshelves for about a year until I decided to actually read it as part of a national Read-a-Thon in January of 2015. I read about half of it in one sitting and then couldn't wait to keep on reading it, although things like watching an almost 3-year-old did get in the way ;o)It's an unusual litt [...]


    26. A very unique book both in style and in topic. This is a quiet novel and one that moves along at a pace of internal struggle and development -- which is to say slowly. Watching the development and transitions that the main character goes through over the course of the year the novel takes place is fascinating -- and it was this aspect that got a 4 star rating. I have to admit that the writing style was hard for me at the beginning the point that I didn't know if I was going to make it through th [...]


    27. What an odd little book this is. It the story of Harriet, a woman who suffers a nervous breakdown after the death of her brother. This results in her being put in an asylum from which she escapes. Making her way to Manhattan, she barely scrapes by until she meets John, a machinist who takes her in. They fall in love and live as husband and wife. All of this takes place during the depths of the Great Depression, so their existence, as well as that everyone they know, is tenuous. Homelessness and [...]


    28. Millen Brand brings alive a long ago New York as the setting for the story of a young woman's regeneration. The main character escapes from a mental hospital where she has spent seven years of her young adulthood. She finds the will to live through the struggle of life during Depression-era New York and the comforts of carnal love. This is a quiet book, not much is said by the character, who calls herself Harriet, but much is observed in careful detail. Although sometimes as bleak as the time an [...]


    29. This was a beautiful novel, not because of anything particular like plot, or character, or language, but because of it's quietness, it's simplicity, and it's ability to describe something so intimately through one person's eyes. I'm not even sure if I'm adequately describing what I liked about itere was something about it that did not ring entirely true, but there were also these moments where I felt that she was taking us really inside herself and her experience. She was living her pain and not [...]


    30. Millen Brand brings alive a long ago New York as the setting for the story of a young woman's regeneration. The main character escapes from a mental hospital where she has spent seven years of her young adulthood. She finds the will to live through the struggle of life during Depression-era New York and the comforts of carnal love. This is a quiet book, not much is said by the character, who calls herself Harriet, but much is observed in careful detail. Although sometimes as bleak as the time an [...]


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