The Write Start: A Guide to Nurturing Writing at Every Stage, from Scribbling to Forming Letters and Writing Stories

The Write Start: A Guide to Nurturing Writing at Every Stage, from Scribbling to Forming Letters and Writing Stories

Jennifer Hallissy / Apr 02, 2020

The Write Start A Guide to Nurturing Writing at Every Stage from Scribbling to Forming Letters and Writing Stories How do you raise children who love to write Jennifer Hallissy believes that if you give children a solid foundation of writing basics they will develop a love of writing that lasts a lifetime In this

  • Title: The Write Start: A Guide to Nurturing Writing at Every Stage, from Scribbling to Forming Letters and Writing Stories
  • Author: Jennifer Hallissy
  • ISBN: 9781590308370
  • Page: 274
  • Format: Paperback
  • How do you raise children who love to write Jennifer Hallissy believes that if you give children a solid foundation of writing basics, they will develop a love of writing that lasts a lifetime In this book, she shares the secrets for supporting young writers, from the smallest of scribblers to middle schoolers mastering script You play an important role in nurturing youHow do you raise children who love to write Jennifer Hallissy believes that if you give children a solid foundation of writing basics, they will develop a love of writing that lasts a lifetime In this book, she shares the secrets for supporting young writers, from the smallest of scribblers to middle schoolers mastering script You play an important role in nurturing your child s writing development You are your child s first writing teacher, and their most important writing role model From teaching your child how to hold a pencil and form the letters of the alphabet, to creating writing spaces and meaningful writing rituals at home, this book gives you all of the information and inspiration you need to raise a confident writer Fifty two playful activities are presented as ways to invite your child to write Each activity offers specific suggestions to meet the needs of Scribblers pre writers , Spellers emerging writers , Storytellers beginner writers , and Scholars experienced young writers providing the just right combination of fun and functional skill development The Write Start is a treasure trove of irresistible ideas that will help you introduce your child to the wonderful world of writing, now, and for years to come.

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      Published :2020-01-13T00:49:39+00:00

    About "Jennifer Hallissy"

      • Jennifer Hallissy

        Jennifer Hallissy Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the The Write Start: A Guide to Nurturing Writing at Every Stage, from Scribbling to Forming Letters and Writing Stories book, this is one of the most wanted Jennifer Hallissy author readers around the world.


    518 Comments

    1. This is a good book for parents with no understanding of encouraging writing in their children, starting when they are very young. For anyone who is a teacher or has an education background, there is very little new here. I did, however, glean one neat idea from the book, which is divided into about 50 different "projects" that cover 4 different levels of writers. The author talked about children liking post-it notes, note cards, and little notebooks, and suggested having those on hand and to ut [...]


    2. Jennifer Hallisy, a pediatric occupational therapist, has written a wonderful resource for parents and early childhood educators entitled The Write Start. In an age of e-mail and texting, the focus on writing has shifted. However, encouraging our children to write gives them a freedom of expression not found elsewhere.I wasn't certain what to expect when I began reading the book. The fact that it was written by an OT gave me hope, but I prepared myself for an instructional guide of how to teach [...]


    3. Loved the first several pages in which the author spells out (har) the importance of looking at children as writers as soon as they are interested in making marks on a page (or swirls in paint). Her informed view as a pediatric occupational therapist promised to make this unique and amazing: she has definite opinions on how children should be taught to hold pencils and draft letters.But it all fell apart when she got to the guts of the matter: the activities themselves, which I found too simplif [...]


    4. Yeah for this book! There are so many neat prompts for things to do with your kiddo. I also really liked the beginning part about how to set up a writing station, the difference between different writing stages, etc. While my little one is just now a scribbler, I will definately be doing a lot of these activities over the years.


    5. It was OK--skimmable, nothing real revolutionary inside. Could have done without the chapter on writing tools--who in the world needs a colored pencil explained to them? Lots of fluff.


    6. The information contained in "The Write Start" is plainly written, easy to understand, and immensely practical. I've been teaching pre-school for 18 years and there was a fair amount of info that was new to me, as well as information I had known but forgotten. She has an excellent appendix with suggestions, lists, resources, etc. Hallissy doesn't talk down to you and she does an excellent job of explaining concepts and reasons. I did have a couple of problems with the book. One was philosophical [...]


    7. Hallissy opens her book on writing by giving parents a solid foundational understanding on the "why's" of writing. Through her expertise as a pediatric occupational therapist, she has found that children that struggle to form letters also struggle to become successful writers. In the first half of The Write Start, Hallissy also identifies four different stages of writing, explaining how to recognize each level and interpret readiness for moving into the next stage of writing. Each chapter is eas [...]


    8. If you have a child under the age of nine or ten, or if you are a teacher or a mentor to a child under the age of ten, or if you know a child under the age of ten, or if you are looking for a gift for a parent of a child under ten Guess what, I think you should check out this book! I found this book at the end of this past school year, and discovered a bunch of fun activities for my kids to work on this summer. My soon-to-be second grader loves to write and journal and create already, but I want [...]


    9. I was an academic star in elementary school, but I had one weakness: handwriting. The feeling of frustration I had when I received less-than-perfect marks on my work still feels fresh today. And it certainly wasn't because I wasn't trying. This book, written by an occupational therapist, could have helped. Perhaps at the root of my problem? At thirty-three years into life, I'm still holding a pencil the wrong way. This book is a must for homeschooling parents, especially those of emerging writer [...]


    10. Jennifer Hallissy, an occupational therapist, shares her insight about the development of writing skill. She explains the different stages of development (scribbler, speller, storyteller, scholar) and the abilities, challenges and activities for practice. She explains the proper tools, posture and other factors important to developing a strong writer. The last half of the book is filled with activities that can be adapted to all stages. As a parent to a scribbler and a storyteller, I found many [...]


    11. This book had some good information on helping kids learn to write, but I think the same information could have been communicated with half as many words or less. I'm so tired of reading parenting books that blather on and on instead of getting to the point. I don't have time to read a 300-page book just to glean information that could be contained in a pamphlet. And the puns in this book were out of control; I really have no patience for puns. That said, I did learn some things to help Bennett [...]


    12. Adult nonfiction; education/early literacy. [reviewed from e-galley.] A solid introduction to developmentally appropriate ways of teaching literacy and writing to young children, including 52 fun activities that can be adapted for various developmental levels. Many of these will be familiar to educators who already incorporate literacy activities into their daily plans, but even veterans will find a few helpful new tips and ideas.


    13. This book has a lot of practical ideas to get your kids writing more. I like how for each activity, Hallissy provides options for several different age levels. None of the activities are rocket science, and I could probably come up with a lot of them on my own, but it is nice to have them all in one volume for when I want a fun, educational activity but am feeling uninspired.


    14. Excellent book if you have a child in your home learning to read and write. Fun ideas for ways to including writing in play and everyday activities, and it also provides basic knowledge of the mechanics of writing with useful tips - for instance did you know that using scissors strengthens kids hands in just the way they need to be able to hold a pencil properly?


    15. I wish I had read this before one of my children taught herself to write. However. It's been incredibly helpful as we've worked toward approaching the mechanics of writing differently. The author presents solid, developmentally-appropriate ideas for a parent (or teacher) at wit's end. The irony is that I used to teach writing. College students are a little different from seven year olds. ;)


    16. Great quick read geared for parents. As a teacher, it was a great reminder of some activities I have know about and some new twists. I especially liked the breakdown by writing stage at the back of each activity. The beginning chapters were also some great basic info about writing and thoughts I could use during conferences with parents.


    17. I love that this book has activities that can be modified for both my two year old and my kindergartner, has great tips for left-handed writers and makes writing fun (I already know that but struggle to make it fun for C).


    18. Outstanding presentation, explanation, activities and examples. Among this type of book, the best I've seen.I can't wait to get started with it.


    19. A great resource. Definitely would be a good one to own and refer back to. A good addition to any child educator's bookshelf.






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